X Factor 2012: Bosses accused of "short changing fans" after hour long show features just eight minutes of singing

X Factor bosses accused of 'short changing fans' after hour long show features just eight minutes of actual singing

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UPDATED:

09:07 GMT, 3 September 2012

It's a reality TV programme that is all about finding the next big singer, yet an hour long show of the X Factor features just eight minutes of actual singing.

Bosses of the ITV1 show have been accused of 'short changing' fans as tonight's episode will feature just five full auditions.

According to the Daily Mirror, the criticism comes as it was suggested the show may be 'running out of talent' after nine years.

Not happy: X Factor bosses have been accused of short changing viewers after an hour long show featured just eight minutes of singing

Not happy: X Factor bosses have been accused of short changing viewers after an hour long show featured just eight minutes of singing
ITV's hit entertainment show is back with a bang for a sixth series as Simon Cowell and Amanda Holden are joined by Alesha Dixon and David Walliamson a new-look judging panel.
Britain's Got Talent is back on the road with the Judges trawling the length and breadth of the UK in search of Britain's best talent.
Hosted by award-winning TV favourites Ant & Dec, Simon Cowell is joined on the exciting new panel by actor and comedian David Walliams; singer, songwriter and dancer Alesha Dixon; and returning Judge, Amanda Holden.
This year the winner will not only have the opportunity to perform at the 2012 Royal Variety Performance, they will also receive a life changing 500,000 – 250,000 of which will come from Simon Cowell's own pocket.
Expect the unexpected on Britain's Got Talent, anything goes from dance troupes to acrobats, magicians to com

Even Simon Cowell described last year's series as 'sub-standard,' saying: 'There wasn’t enough raw talent. It won’t happen again. The selection process has to be better.'

It comes as the music mogul is apparently feeling disappointed that this year's wannabes have failed to impress the public.

'He always wants the singers to be bigger and better than the previous year,' a source told the newspaper.

In trouble: The show is said to be struggling to find really good and interesting talent

In trouble: The show is said to be struggling to find really good and interesting talent

'But that’s simply not happening. It’s almost as if the well of talent has dried up.'

It seems that despite judge Tulisa Contostavlos claiming the show is 'all about the music,' viewers will only see proper auditions from five contestants tonight with each of them singing for just over one minute each.

However, that may be more than enough time for judge Nicole Scherzinger who is said to be disappointed with the lack of good acts.

'It’s a Talent-Free Zone. I expected more,' she said of auditions in Newcastle.

Not enough singing: Nicola Marie is just one of five full auditions that will feature on tonight's show

Not enough singing: Nicola Marie is just one of five full auditions that will feature on tonight's show

Meanwhile, a representative for The X Factor has explained to the MailOnline why it may appear they way it does.

They explain that this week’s show is 60 minutes long – whereas the last two shows have been 75 minutes in length. Therefore there will only be four parts instead of five.

They add: 'Last year’s four part/show three featured almost exactly the same amount of singers and in fact one entire part with just ‘no’s’ so there is more good singing on this show compared to last year.

'A 60” show runs 48” with adverts – advertising minutes are regulated, the advert pattern will be exactly the same as last year.'

The spokesperson added: 'We’re featuring the same amount of singers in the audition shows as we did last year – but we believe the standard of talent is even higher in 2012.

'We’re getting hugely positive reactions to acts including Lucy whose audition has been viewed nearly three million times in less than a week.

'This week’s show features more outstanding acts which we’re sure our audiences will enjoy.'