There goes the bride: Women say they would rather travel the world than get married

There goes the bride… Women say they would rather travel the world than get married

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UPDATED:

20:24 GMT, 4 May 2012

Walking down the aisle in a white dress to say 'I do' to the man of their dreams was once every woman's lifetime goal.

But now British women would rather travel the world than tie the knot, according to a new survey.

The desire to get married is sliding down a woman's 'life to-do list', according to a research poll by Bing, Microsoft's search engine.

No longer a top priority: Women said getting married was fourth on their life to do list, according to a recent poll (posed by models)

No longer a top priority: Women said getting married was fourth on their life to do list, according to a recent poll (posed by models)

The poll found that women's top priority in life was to travel the world while living in another country was third in the list.

Getting married fell in fourth behind these aims. However British women aren't completely against settling down as they voted having a family their second most important target.

Sociologist Jenni Trent Hughes says the shift in priorities is thanks to women having more independence today than their mothers and grandmothers.

'Getting married would have been at the
top of the list for women over a decade or two ago, but now with our
hard-won independence and more equal footing in society women are just
as ready to travel the world as men,' she said.

Meanwhile, getting hitched was also not a main concern for the men polled. It came in ninth in their top ten to do list behind more rock and roll dreams to 'drive an F1 car' and 'record an album'.

Globe-trotting: Both men and women said their number one target was to travel the world (posed by model)

Globe-trotting: Both men and women said their number one target was to travel the world (posed by model)

Like women, their top priority was to travel the world but they ranked living abroad over having a family.

Trent Hughes said the fact both sexes want a family but aren't prioritising marriage is 'another sign of the times'.

While the number of marriages in the UK has been falling in recent years, cohabitation has risen from a
million couples in 2001 to 2.9million in 2010 – and it is projected to
rise to 3.7million by 2031.

The news will come as a blow top British judge Sir Paul Coleridge, who earlier this week launched a new campaign group, The Marriage Foundation, to promote marriage as the 'gold standard' for relationships.

He believes that unmarried couples are detrimental to society and that children are happier with married parents.

'The evidence I find overwhelming is
that married relationships are more stable and the children of such
relationships fare better,' he said.

UK WOMEN'S TOP TEN LIFE TO DO LISTTravelling the worldHaving a familyLiving in another countryGetting marriedLearning a new skillOwning a shopStriking the work life balanceOwning a bar or restaurantSwimming with dolphinsRecording an album
UK MEN'S TOP TEN LIFE TO DO LISTTravelling the worldLiving in another countryHaving a familyLearning a new skillDriving an F1 carRecording an albumStriking the work life balanceOwning a bar or restaurantGetting marriedActing in a film

Bing wants to find out what Brits really want to do with their lives, and will help make the best ones happen. To tell Bing what you want to do visit facebook.com/binguk.