The skinny on how top chefs stay in shape – despite being surrounded by food all day

Vegetables for breakfast and starter portions as mains: The skinny on how top chefs stay in shape – despite being surrounded by food all day

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UPDATED:

18:16 GMT, 5 April 2012

Top chefs are immersed in a world of tempting treats, leaving people curious as to how their waistlines can often remain slim.

But a group of some of the best have spilled the beans. A new book titled Smart Chefs Stay Slim has revealed their diet and exercise secrets.

Written by People magazine editor Allison Adato, the book features
tips on how everybody can 'keep their love for food without foregoing a healthy
lifestyle' from The Food Network’s Iron Chef stars Cat Cora, Tom Colicchio and other
leading cooks.

Skills: Naomi Pomeroy, right, of Portland's Beast restaurant is just one of the chefs featured in a new book called Smart Chefs Stay Thin by Allison Adato

Skills: Naomi Pomeroy, right, of Portland's Beast restaurant is just one of the chefs featured in a new book called Smart Chefs Stay Thin by Allison Adato

They have divulged savvy tips on everything from
breakfast choices to exercise habits.

Naomi Pomeroy, owner of Portland's Beast restaurant and who has also
appeared on Iron Chef, agreed with the popular myth that skipping breakfast is
unhealthy. But she makes sure she does not indulge.

She revealed: 'I started eating wheat toast with my tea.'

The book’s author said: 'Many chefs also start the day with
vegetables – sauteing fresh spinach can be done in the same pan in which you
fry your egg.'

SKINNY TIPS FROM TOP CHEFS
Naomi Pomeroy recommends having food 'wrapped to take home.' It cuts portion sizes and 'means an extra 20 minutes of sleep in the morning because [you] don’t
have to make lunch.'Eric Ripert says to 'cook fish or chicken in the toaster over. It's easy
and you cannot mess it up.'Cat Cora makes sure her four children are eating healthy by cooking
grilled fish, chicken and vegetables and putting them on sticks to appear entertaining to youngsters.
Marc Murphy advises to 'avoid using salt as it adds fat to a dish. Instead,
season the food before you cook it.'

Some chefs have also said they order starters at
restaurants rather than main meals.

According to Mr Colicchio, who is one of the co-founders of New
York's Gramercy Tavern, smaller portioned starter dishes are 'usually more interesting than
entrees.'

Ms Pomeroy also leaves a decent part of her meal to take home with her as it helps to ensure smaller portion sizes are devoured at night.

Exercise is another vital part in any skinny chef's diet.

A bout of cycling, climbing, hiking, swimming and yoga often
features in Mrs Cora's weekly regime.

But while they all make a conscious effort to stay in shape, many chefs stressed that people should never feel guilty
after eating something they love.

Eric Ripert, chef and co-owner of New York's Le Bernardin
restaurant, said it is 'inconceivable to have guilt over eating.

Chef Cat Cora

Eric Ripert

Foodies: Iron Chef star Cat Cora (left) and New York's Eric Ripert (right), who owns the popular Le Barnardin restaurant in Manhattan, have shared their diet secrets

'I was educated from a young age to eat good food –
good quality ingredients, in moderation.'

Talent: Allison Adato's book features some of the best culinary heroes

Talent: Allison Adato's book features some of the best culinary heroes

Marc Murphy, owner of New York's two Landmarc restaurants, believes
adults should remember they are not children – which means they should not be
eating like one.

Rather than eating pasta most nights like many children do,
according to Ms Adato, lesbian chef Mrs Cora and her wife Jennifer cook healthy foods that
the kids can enjoy also such as grilled fish, chicken and vegetables.

Mrs Cora said: 'I do a great saffron-honey roast chicken.'

After Jamie Oliver's recent weight-related outburst, which involved him calling an Australian journalist a 'bitch' for enquiring about him putting on the pounds, it is not likely that the famed celebrity chef has contributed to Ms Adato's new book.

The 36-year-old said in defence of the outburst: 'I went out and had a few drinks after a very long day, [and] my brain did not quite understand that question.'