The Queen wears head scarf to protects against "Siberian" cold at Jubilee tree planting ceremony


How one keeps warm at a tree planting: The Queen and Princess Anne wear headscarves to protect against 'Siberian' cold


Wrapped up: The Queen and Princess Anne took no chances against the cold weather this morning as they arrived for a Jubilee Tree Planting

Wrapped up: The Queen and Princess Anne took no chances against the cold weather this morning as they arrived for a Jubilee Tree Planting

With the temperature forecast to plunge as low as -11C tonight, most people are avoiding the cold unless they absolutely must

But the freezing conditions didn't keep the Queen and Princess Anne from taking part in a tree-planting ceremony at the new 20-acre Jubilee Wood on the Sandringham estate in Norfolk today.

The Queen, wearing a bottle-green overcoat, looked incredibly lively alongside Princess Anne as the Royal pair sported headscarves to ward off the bitter wind.

Her Majesty seemed to have no problem whatsoever lifting the heavy shovel and whacking the earth three times as part of the project which aims to plant 6million native British trees to mark the Diamond Jubilee.

The Queen seemed particularly amused that her tree had more leaves than Princess Anne's,asking: 'Is hers the same as mine

'Mine has so many more leaves.'

Making light of the bitter morning conditions, the Queen joked: 'It is terribly bleak here – there is nothing between here and Siberia.'

Anne, patron of the project, said: 'Trees often form part of royal celebrations.

'The Duke of Edinburgh planted one at Sandringham for the Queen’s Coronation.

'Those trees will be enjoyed by generations to come. People will grow up with them and they will be engraved on our memories.'

The royal pair watched as pupils from Sandringham and West Newton and Flitcham primary schools began planting their own trees.

Over the next 15 months, the Woodland
Trust’s Jubilee Woods Project will fund new woods across the country.

Today marked the start of the tree-planting and a million are expected
to be planted in February alone.

The
project is funded by supermarket giant Sainsbury’s, which has pledged
to raise 1.5million by increasing the number of donations made from
products in store.

Heavy metal: The Queen had no problem lifting the heavy shovel and bashing down the earth to ensure the sapling stays upright

Digging, the planting Queen: The monarch had no problem lifting the heavy shovel and bashing down the earth to ensure the sapling stays upright

Making light of the bitter morning conditions, the Queen joked: 'It is terribly bleak here - there is nothing between here and Siberia'

Making light of the bitter morning conditions, the Queen joked: 'It is terribly bleak here – there is nothing between here and Siberia'

Warm smile: The Queen planted an oak which will be a focal point of the new 20-acre Jubilee Wood project, aiming to plant six million native British trees

Warm smile: The Queen planted an oak which will be a focal point of the new 20-acre Jubilee Wood project, aiming to plant six million native British trees

Sue Holden, chief executive of the Woodland Trust, said: 'This is a project which will suitably commemorate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and provide a fitting legacy for generations to come, providing recreation, cleaner air and vital habitat for wildlife.'

Sainsbury’s already donates 1p from every dozen Woodland eggs sold, 2p from Woodland chicken and 10p from Woodland turkeys to the Woodland Trust.

This will be extended to other products.

The Woodland Trust is to distribute free community tree packs containing 105 or 420 native tree species.

These packs come in four themes, each containing an oak sapling grown from acorns collected on royal estates.

Sainsbury’s chief executive Justin King attended the event.

He said: 'We’ve already helped plant over 825,000 trees since 2004 thanks to donations from sales of our Woodland eggs and chicken, and this project will see even more donations from products, support through our stores and the Active Kids scheme.

'We’ve got ambitious plans to plant two million trees by 2015, so this project is integral to this commitment, our wider values and we’re proud to provide our support.'

A plaque commemorates the Queen's tree-planting in the Diamond Jubilee Wood in Norfolk

A plaque commemorates the Queen's tree-planting in the Diamond Jubilee Wood in Norfolk

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall attend a Candlemas service at Saint Michael's Church in Camden, north London today

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall attend a Candlemas service at Saint Michael's Church in Camden, north London today

Princes William and Harry pay tribute to their grandmother in an upcoming three-part BBC documentary

Princes William and Harry pay tribute to their grandmother in an upcoming three-part BBC documentary

Princes William and Harry pay tribute to their grandmother in an upcoming three-part BBC documentary

In the documentary, one of the Queens's granddaughters, Princess Eugenie, says: 'Whenever Granny walks into a room, everyone stands up, stops and kind of just watches her'

In the documentary, one of the Queens's granddaughters, Princess Eugenie, says: 'Whenever Granny walks into a room, everyone stands up, stops and kind of just watches her'

In the documentary, one of the Queens's granddaughters,
Princess Eugenie, says: 'Whenever Granny walks into a room, everyone
stands up, stops and kind of just watches her'