The Queen is a fan of wacky artist Charlotte Cory"s stuffed animal portraits

One is amused! The Queen a fan of wacky artist's stuffed animal portraits

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UPDATED:

14:14 GMT, 7 June 2012

Charlotte Cory's potty artwork, which fuses Victorian portraiture and taxidermy, is fast becoming a hit with collectors all over the world, including the Queen.

Although some might find the scenes of animals in humanised scenarios disturbing, the British artist has witnessed growing popularity since producing the works and her quirky images can now be found emblazoned on a range of goods from playing cards to tea towels.

Her Majesty herself purchased two pieces to hang on the walls at her home in Windsor Castle and dozens of the pictures have been put together for the first time in a book called You Animal, You.

Furry friends: A bright eyed creature models a tailored three-piece suit

Furry friends: A bright eyed creature models a tailored three-piece suit

Ms Cory, who also works as a writer, was inspired to create the series after being presented with a stuffed sparrow as a child by her grandmother.

As a teenager she gradually developed a fascination with the animal kingdom drawing and studying different species wherever she went.

Then in 2005 she decided to combine her lifelong fascination in zoology with a growing interest in photography and set up a darkroom at home to develop black and white prints.

In a bid to rescue old stuffed
animals and forgotten photographs, she started fusing the two
together revamping vintage photographic calling cards, knwon as 'cartes-de-visite' which were a craze in the Victorian era.

A good read Ms Cory named this piece of artwork The Distinguished Essayist

A good read Ms Cory named this piece of artwork The Distinguished Essayist

Denbigh Dog

Gentleman Badger

A dog stands in all her finery while a gentleman badger showcases his top hat

Describing her inspiration she
said: 'And yet there is something sadder: stuffed animals in museums,
shot long ago not on glass plates but with guns, their very bodies
likewise preserved for posterity to gawk at. Where did this moth-eaten
tiger sniff his last antelope, over what distant verdure did that dusty
parrot flap tremulous emerald wings

'One
day it came to me: why not recycle the dispossessed pictures and the
long dead creatures. Grant them all a new lease of life. Better, more
colourful, more deserving than before.'

To create the images she takes photographs of stuffed
animals and puts them on the bodies of those posing in the vintage carte-de-visite pictures which she purchases from junk shops or antique
markets.

Tiffereau

Royal Panopticon

To create the images Ms Cory takes photographs of stuffed animals and puts them on the bodies of those posing in the vintage cartes-de-visite pictures

Union Jack

Tigress

The Queen purchased two pieces to hang on the walls at her home in Windsor Castle

The artist has labelled the creations
'Visitorians' and says initial reactions of laughter often give way to more
serious contemplation.

Ms Cory added: 'So
I’ve put these ideas together. At first people laugh and think they are
quite funny, but then they stop laughing and find them moving.

'I
didn’t want to call them 'people' or 'animals' so these are
Visitorians. The Queen has bought two of them and I drove to Windsor
Castle myself to drop them off.'

The book is published by Black Dog and costs 19.99