Tan fans beware: Sun worshippers can see the future thanks to new anti-ageing app, and the results are not pretty


Tan fans beware: Sun worshippers can see the future thanks to new anti-ageing app, and the results are not pretty

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UPDATED:

17:21 GMT, 23 August 2012

This summer thousands of people will be hitting the beach on holiday and sunbathing all day in the hope of getting a tan.

Inspired bronzed by celebrities like the Only Way Is Essex's Amy Childs, they'll be hoping a sun tan will give them a healthy glow and attractive look.

But now a new summer safety campaign from Superdrug is showing how young people will pay for sun-worshipping later in life when the damage to their skin catches up with them.

Sun-damaged: Kate needs to stay safe in the sun to avoid looking this wrinkled, right, in 25 years time according to the Superdrug app

Sun-damaged Duchess: Kate needs to stay safe in the sun to avoid looking this wrinkled, right, in 25 years time according to the Superdrug app

Sun-damaged Duchess: Kate needs to stay safe in the sun to avoid looking this wrinkled, right, in 25 years time according to the Superdrug app

Face of the future: While her younger sister Pippa Middleton would not fare any better getting sun spots and lines, right, if she lets her skin get too sun-damaged

Face of the future: While her younger sister Pippa Middleton would not fare any better getting sun spots and lines, right, if she lets her skin get too sun-damaged

Face of the future: While her younger sister Pippa Middleton would not fare any better getting sun spots and lines, right, if she lets her skin get too sun-damaged

The beauty chain has launched an online app giving people a glimpse into their sun-damaged future.

Customers can upload a picture of themselves and the answer a few short questions on their sunbathing habits, including what factor sun cream they use (if any) and how often they use a sun bed.

The 'burnometer' then shows how the person will look due to potential sun damage in five, 15 and 25 years time using research from the British
Association of Dermatologists to overlay the person's complexion.

Those who have sunbathed the most and neglected to use sun protection look the most ravaged by time with wrinkles and sun spots.

Tan fan: But Amy Childs should stick to the fake stuff unless she wants to look this aged, right, in her forties

Tan fan: But Amy Childs should stick to the fake stuff unless she wants to look this aged, right, in her forties

Tan fan: But Amy Childs should stick to the fake stuff unless she wants to look this aged, right, in her forties

We tried the app using a number of pictures of celebrities including the Duchess of Cambridge and Victoria Beckham to show how they might look in years to come unless they take care in the sun. The stars would no doubt be shocked by the results which show them with lined foreheads and crow's feet.

Mel Wilson, Superdrug head of healthcare said: 'These pics can be scary, however it’s not all bad news, the app also recommends products suitable for each skin type in order to keep skin looking its best and to stay protected in the sun.

'It is a fact that if you shield your skin form the harmful rays of the sun you have less chance of getting skin cancer, and your skin will age in a more natural way.'

Sun safety: Jessica Ennis should wear a high factor sun cream when training outdoors so she doesn't look prematurely aged in years to come

Sun safety: Jessica Ennis should wear a high factor sun cream when training outdoors so she doesn't look prematurely aged in years to come

Sun safety: Jessica Ennis should wear a high factor sun cream when training outdoors so she doesn't look prematurely aged in years to come, right

Lined Spice: Victoria Beckham could have a lined forehead and face if she doesn't stay safe in the sun

Lined Spice: Victoria Beckham could have a lined forehead and face if she doesn't stay safe in the sun

Lined Spice: Victoria Beckham could have a lined forehead and face, right, if she doesn't stay safe in the sun

This year Superdrug has partnered with Teenage Cancer Trust to raise funds to educate young people about cancer.

Simon Davies, Chief Executive of Teenage Cancer Trust said the app is an innovative way of teaching people of the dangers of sun damage.

He said: 'With over 100,000 cases of skin cancer a year in Britain, young people need to learn the dangers of over exposure to the sun.

'Teenage Cancer Trust already delivers free sun safety sessions in schools, colleges and universities across the UK as part of the Shunburn campaign so this interactive app is a further way of hitting home to people the long term damage the sun can do to your skin.'

To try the app for yourself, visit www.superdrug.com/page/burnometer