Chanel No 5: EU threats to ban one of perfumes key ingredients

The EU's threatening to ban one of Chanel No 5's key ingredients… So what's really in the world's favourite perfume A bottle of Chanel No 5 is sold every 30 seconds around the world Scientists are testing whether a key ingredient – a naturally occurring type of tree moss – causes allergies European Commission’s Scientific Committee of Consumer Safety wants the material banned Outcome could also affect Miss Dior, Guerlain’s Shalimar and Angel by Thierry Mugler | UPDATED: 12:08 GMT, 7 November 2012 Under threat: A key ingredient used in Chanel No 5 may be banned if found to cause allergies Famously, it was the only thing Marilyn Monroe wore in bed, and it has been synonymous with style and sophistication for more than nine decades.

Do your friends influence your weight? How we feel about our size and shape is influenced by our friends, according to a new study

Do YOUR friends make you feel fat How we feel about our size and shape is influenced by the way pals feel about theirs, study reveals | UPDATED: 17:17 GMT, 6 November 2012 It is a well-known fact that women compare their figures with one another. But scientists have now taken this social comparing one step further, saying that women's body-related issues mirror what they think their friends' body image concerns are too.

Skinny genes: Body type research at Michigan State University in International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Do you have skinny genes Each woman's feelings about her size and shape are down to her genetic make-up, say scientists Research carried out at Michigan State University The 'thin ideal internalisation' of identical and fraternal twins was studied Findings published in International Journal of Eating Disorders | UPDATED: 07:39 GMT, 3 October 2012 Whether you feel fat, thin, average or you simply don't care may have nothing to do with the chocolate cake you ate (or didn't eat) yesterday.

The secret of slimness? 300 fewer calories

The secret of slimness 300 fewer calories | UPDATED: 07:21 GMT, 27 August 2012 The trick to keeping weight off permanently is to cut 300 calories from your daily food intake You’ve managed to slim down, but how do you keep the weight off for good Dieters frequently report reaching their goal weight, only to find that the pounds creep back on. But scientists now think they understand why this occurs and say the trick to keeping weight off permanently is to cut 300 calories from your daily food intake. In a study presented at the European Congress on Obesity earlier this year, Professor Michael Rosenbaum described how dieters need to consume 22 per cent fewer calories a day than someone who hasn’t dieted simply to maintain their weight (so a non-dieter could consume 1,600 calories a day and not gain weight, while a dieter of the same weight must stick to around 1,300).

RayFish Footwear making $1,800 sneakers with colourful prints "grown" to order by mixing and matching stingray DNA

A fishy business The $1,800 sneakers with colourful prints 'grown' to order by mixing and matching stingray DNA | UPDATED: 22:58 GMT, 30 May 2012 A new footwear company is customising the skin of living stingrays to make $1,800 bespoke sneakers. RayFish Footwear enables customers 'grow' their own stingray by having scientists mix and match DNA from several different species, breeding unique patterns and colours in their skin. The company claims to have perfected the genetic modification of stingrays, which has been met with both skepticism and disgust from PETA and bioengineering scientists

Want to lose weight? Tuck in to curry, chocolate and cheese!

Want to lose weight Tuck in to curry, chocolate and cheese! | UPDATED: 22:07 GMT, 6 May 2012 There’s no doubt the worst thing about dieting is denying yourself the foods you love. When willpower starts to weaken, it’s invariably chocolate, cheese or a big glass of wine that haul us off the weight-loss wagon

The three second rule fact or fiction? Scientists reveal whether food dropped on the floor is safe to eat

Do YOU believe in the three second rule Scientists reveal whether food dropped on the floor is safe to eat (if it's picked up quickly enough) | UPDATED: 13:28 GMT, 3 May 2012 Who hasn't picked up a piece of dropped food from the floor, given it a quick blow and assumed it was still safe to eat To many of us, it is second nature to apply the age-old pseudo-scientific 'three second rule' on such occasions, telling ourselves we're safe if the food hit the floor only momentarily. The idea that food is not contaminated if it is retrieved quickly has been believed for many years – but there has not been extensive proof that this is the case.

Was Einstein the world"s worst husband? Wife ordered to keep room tidy, serve three meals a day – but expect NO affection… and she must stop…

Was Einstein the world's worst husband Wife ordered to keep room tidy, serve three meals a day – but expect NO affection… and she must stop talking when he demands it | UPDATED: 13:30 GMT, 23 April 2012 He remains one of the world's most important scientists

Looking in the mirror DOES make you more anxious about your looks

Looking in the mirror DOES make you more anxious about your looksTen minutes of looking at reflection increases anxietyOn average women stare in the mirror 38 times a day‘It’s possible that staring at yourself in the mirror for long periods is not a good thing,' says psychologist Some of us do it out of sheer vanity, others because we hate the way we look and want to try and change it. But whatever the reason, it seems staring at yourself in the mirror does more psychological harm than good. New research shows volunteers who gazed at their reflections for up to ten minutes at a time gradually became more and more anxious and depressed about their looks – even if they were perfectly happy with them to start with

A Cambridge scientist believes we have only seen the beginning of animals" telepathic powers

Is your pet psychic A Cambridge scientist believes we have only seen the beginning of animals' telepathic powers Ability of animals to seemingly anticipate disasters is ignored by Western scientists But could monitoring their behaviour help to save lives One of my former neighbours in my home town of Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, was a widow whose son was a sailor in the merchant navy. He did not like to tell his mother when he would be coming home on leave because he was afraid she would worry if he was delayed on the way. But his mother always knew anyway — thanks to the family cat.