Stressed Brits use one third of their annual holiday allowance trying to unwind

Stressed Brits use one third of their annual holiday allowance trying to unwind

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UPDATED:

16:39 GMT, 25 October 2012

It takes overworked Britons a third of their annual holidays to properly de-stress, a survey reveals.

That's the equivalent of eight days per year trying to unwind, and on in ten of us never manages to switch off at all.

Not out of office: Over half of Briton's admit to checking their work emails at least once a day while on holiday

Not out-of-office: Over half of Briton's admit to checking their work emails at least once a day while on holiday

As parents prepare for the half term getaway a third admit to taking up to five days to get into holiday mode and two fifths continue to check emails, texts and voicemails while away, unwilling to leave their work blackberry or smart phone at home.

This is despite a third of people recognising that work is to blame for being the main killer of a holiday mood and that working while away causes couples to argue.

Surprisingly those aged 25 to 34 years old are the most affected by work distractions abroad, with almost half saying they think about work every other day of the week.

Additionally, other areas of our lives intruding into holidays explain why we just can’t chill out.

A third blame their cash flow problems, a quarter blame family stresses or arguments while being crowded by other holidaymakers cause a fifth to become irritated.

It seems northerners are the best at switching off. Closely followed by the Scots, who take just one day to relax while Londoners take on average three days.

Work is furthest from the minds of people from Yorkshire with just 17 per cent thinking about work while on holiday compared to 41 per cent of Londoners.

Still can't relax: One in ten of us fails to ever manage to switch off completely - no matter how beautiful the views

Still can't relax: One in ten of us fails to ever manage to switch off completely – no matter how beautiful the views

Those from the Capital also find it the most difficult to resist checking on work emails, voicemails and texts.

The survey was done by Heathrow Airport, who in a bid to bring some holiday cheer to the 1.5 million passengers expected over the short break, have opened a pop-up park in Terminal 5 laying down soft grass, real hedges and aromatic rosemary and jasmine bushes to give passengers a relaxing space to de-stress in.

A spokesperson said: 'Holidays are precious, providing us vital time to relax and recharge our batteries.

'We want to help our passengers start their holiday the moment they arrive at the airport, and make sure their time away is as relaxing and enjoyable as possible.'