Step away from that lipstick! How stores" make-up samples are filled with bacteria, mould and fecal matter


Step away from that lipstick! How stores' make-up samples are filled with bacteria, mould and fecal matter

PUBLISHED:

22:18 GMT, 19 June 2012

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UPDATED:

22:18 GMT, 19 June 2012

The make-up testers at department stores have been revealed to be filled with bacteria, mould and fecal matter.

Good Morning America went undercover to test the safety of shared make-up testers, which on average, are switched out only once a year.

The show sampled ten stores over two states, using sterile swabs and undercover cameras to gather evidence, which were sent to New York University's Microbiology department for testing.

Tester truths: Good Morning America went undercover to test the safety of shared make-up testers, which, on average, beauty counters switch out once a year

Tester truths: Good Morning America went undercover to test the safety of shared make-up testers, which, on average, beauty counters switch out once a year

The results revealed what germs people are sharing when they test the same eye-shadows, foundations and lipsticks as hundreds, or thousands, of other strangers.

Much like the handles of supermarket
trolleys, bathroom doorhandles, staircase hand rails and computer
keyboards, the majority of samples and applicators available at makeup
vendors are caked with mold and bacteria.

One out of every five samples, or 20per cent, showed significant growth of mould, yeast, or fecal matter.

Samples: The show tested ten stores over two states, using sterile swabs and undercover cameras to gather evidence

Samples: The show tested ten stores over two states, using sterile swabs and undercover cameras to gather evidence

Evidence: The swabs were sent to New York University's Microbiology department for testing

Evidence: The swabs were sent to New York University's Microbiology department for testing, with 20per cent showing growth of mould, yeast, or fecal matter

Some make-up testers were harboring such strains of bacteria that, according to Philip Tierno, Director of Microbiology at NYU Langone Medical Centre, can make you sick.

He said: 'If you have an open cut, you might not want to go the route of using make-up that has been used by other people.'

Allure editor-in-chief, Linda Wells,
added: 'To me make-up testers are like petri dishes, I would not want to
go near one. There are better ways to do it'.

'Make-up testers are like petri dishes, I would not want to go near one'

Brushes
and foundations were found to be the worst offenders, with make-up
experts suggesting that consumers test foundations on the neck rather
than the face.

With lipstick, they recommend testing colors on the pad of your finger, which, considering how many times hands come into contact with the mouth, this might need to be reconsidered.

For eyeshadow and eyeliner, which tied with foundation for the most germ-filled, it is recommended to use a disposable applicator on the back of your hands

Interestingly, Good Morning America also found there was no germ difference between the most upscale department stores and the regular drug-stores.