Richard and Chloe Madeley have their hands full carrying five drinks at an after party

They must be thirsty! Richard and Chloe Madeley have their hands full carrying five drinks at an after party

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UPDATED:

14:44 GMT, 21 March 2012

With over 30 years experience working in television, Richard Madeley has been to his fair share of glitzy events.

But the 55-year-old was still taking full advantage of the complimentary drinks, last night, at an after party held at Floridita in central London.

The former This Morning presenter was spotted with his hands full as he attempted to carry three glasses of white wine and a couple of short drinks at the Sweeney Todd press night after party.

Help please: Richard Madeley and daughter Chloe have their hands full of drinks, last night, in London

Help please: Richard Madeley and daughter Chloe have their hands full of drinks, last night, in London

Unable to balance all the drinks comfortably, he roped his very reluctant looking daughter in to help him out.

Chloe Madeley appeared annoyed to say the least as her father passed her a couple of drinks, while he carried some of the glasses under his arm.

The 24-year-old soon perked up once she realised her frown was caught on camera, and she saw the funny side of the situation.

Caught in action: Chloe Madeley realises that she is being watched as her father passes her some drinks to carry

Caught in action: Chloe Madeley realises that she is being watched as her father passes her some drinks to carry

All smiles: The former Dancing on Ice star saw the funny side of things and didn't stay mad at her father

All smiles: The former Dancing on Ice star saw the funny side of things and didn't stay mad at her father

The former Dancing on Ice contestant looked fabulous in a short white lace dress which she teamed with a brown belt and matching heels.

Richard dressed in his trademark style of a suit and shirt with no tie.

The father and daughter had extra special ties to the stage show because they had a close friend treading the boards.

Family affair: The father and daughter had a friend who had appeared in the stage show, Sweeney Todd

Family affair: The father and daughter had a friend who had appeared in the stage show Sweeney Todd

The voice: Singer Tom Jones caught up with Dame Norma Major at the after party for Sweeney Todd

The voice: Singer Tom Jones caught up with Dame Norma Major at the after party for Sweeney Todd

Richard tweeted: 'In taxi with Chloe on way to see r mate+her godfather John Bowe in 1st night of Sweeney Todd. John's the depraved Judge Turpin.'

They clearly enjoyed the performance and were quick to praise the stars.

Richard tweeted: 'Sweeney Todd at Adelphi – opening night a triumph. Judge Turpin truly,decadently EVIL.book now!Michael Ball,Imelda Staunton brill RT please.'

Mr and Mrs: Robert Lindsay and his wife Rosemary Ford looked a picture of happiness as they hugged in the Adelphi Theatre

Mr and Mrs: Robert Lindsay and his wife Rosemary Ford looked a picture of happiness as they hugged in the Adelphi Theatre, after the show

Other celebrities at the event included Dame Norma Major, who is married to former Prime Minister John Major, and Tom Jones.

The Voice judge looked dapper in a houndstooth blazer while Dame Norma also looked great in a white jacket.

Veteran actor Robert Lindsay was inseparable from his wife Rosemary Ford, and the couple embraced tightly as they posed for a picture.

Very important people: Theatre owner Sally Greene and actor Samantha Bond joined the party at Floridita

Very important people: Theatre owner Sally Greene and actor Samantha Bond joined the party at Floridita

Very important people: Theatre owner Sally Greene and actor Samantha Bond joined the party at Floridita

Play hard: Director Jonathan Kent and Imelda Staunton let their hair down after the performance and enjoy a drink

Play hard: Director Jonathan Kent and Imelda Staunton let their hair down after the performance and enjoy a drink

Bearded funnyman David Mitchell also attended the party, as did actress Samantha Bond and Old Vic Theatre owner Sally Greene.

Michael Ball and Imelda Staunton, who star in Sweeney Todd, kept a professional front and were seen speaking to director Jonathan Kent.

Comic man: David Mitchell sported a beard to the show and wore a purple shirt with a blazer

Comic man: David Mitchell sported a beard to the show and wore a purple shirt with a blazer

Shining stars: Michael Ball and Imelda Staunton strike a pose out of their stage costumes

Shining stars: Michael Ball and Imelda Staunton strike a pose out of their stage costumes

FIRST NIGHT REVIEW FROM QUENTIN LETTS

Verdict: It's hide behind your hands time

Deadly: Michael Ball and John Bowe put on a good show in Sweeney Todd

Deadly: Michael Ball and John Bowe put on a good show in Sweeney Todd

Where there’s yuck there’s brass. That may be the calculation behind Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd.

In this transfer from Chichester it is staged and sung and acted with verve. Professionalism at every turn. A top band.

For all this showmanship, the
nastiness overwhelms. Vindictive barber Todd and his accomplice Mrs
Lovett turn innocent (and some not so innocent) victims into meat pies.

A boy finds himself eating a dead man’s hair and fingernails. Blood spurts from throats. There are clever rhymes about the greasiness of dead lawyers’ bodies.

I left the Adelphi impressed but sickened. Sweeney Todd is a dark night.

Imelda Staunton deploys all her comic talent as Mrs Lovett to try to alleviate the tale’s grisliness. It does not matter that her voice pinks and rattles like an Italian moped engine.

Every time her sparrow frame steps on stage, the pace quickens. This is no bad thing, for musical director Nicholas Skilbeck does not rush Sondheim’s schematic score.

Michael Ball’s Todd wears a whitened face in his first scene, along with a long lick of straight, black hair.

The psychotic Todd has returned to London from the penal colony of Australia.

He seeks his wife and daughter Johanna. Frustrated, he sets out on a brutal campaign against mankind, serving ‘a dark and vengeful god’. There is, he reasons, nothing unusual about cannibalism.

In the modern world do men not effectively consume other men all the time

And so we get a musical about a mass murderer, set not in Victorian times but in a mish-mash of the 1920s and later.

The deadly barber’s shop chair, done up in red leather, whooshes corpses down to Mrs Lovett’s basement.

John Bowe and Peter Polycarpou do grand turns as a baddie judge and his beadle. Robert Burt, playing a rival barber, is a ringer for the moustachioed chap in the Go Compare adverts.

A subplot of Johanna (Lucy May Barker) and her wet boy-friend (Luke Brady) barely smoulders. Everything is subservient to the evil of Todd and his glinting razors.

Director Jonathan Kent delivers spectacle. The whole thing is done with artistic oompf.

But my neighbour, in her late 40s, repeatedly hid behind her hands and children will be given nightmares.