Queen"s Diamond Jubilee waxwork unveiled at Tussauds after 150,000 makeover

She won't be amused! Tussauds unveils Queen's 150,000 Diamond Jubilee waxwork (but why does it have MORE wrinkles than the real thing)

Diamond Jubilee waxwork unveiled at Tussauds after 150,000 makeover

|

UPDATED:

15:00 GMT, 14 May 2012

The Queen's waxwork was unveiled at Madame Tussauds in London this morning following a 150,000 makeover.

But eagle-eyed observers have suggested that the new statue, which will be the Queen's 23rd likeness at the world-famous waxwork museum, has been given more wrinkles – and indeed, some suggest that the new statue now has more wrinkles than the monarch has in real life.

The makeover was carried out in honour of the Diamond Jubilee to mark the monarch's 60 years on the throne. While the 86-year-old monarch did not sit for the
recreation she did send over her measurements and approvals for
different aspects of the sculpture.

Scroll down for video

A Jubilee tribute: Queen's new waxwork is unveiled at Madame Tussauds London today

A Jubilee tribute: Queen's new waxwork is unveiled at Madame Tussauds London today, with the monarch's face looking slightly more lined than it was in previous incarnations

Family affair: The Queen's waxwork can be found in the Royal room alongside Prince Philip and the other members of the Royal family, including the recently revealed statues of William and Kate

Family
affair: The Queen's updated waxwork can be found in the Royal room alongside
a youthful-looking Prince Philip, whose waxwork was not given a makeover to bring it up to date, and the other members of the Royal family, including the
recently revealed statues of William and Kate

Ageing gracefully: The Queen's waxwork, left, and right, the monarch last week at the opening of Parliament looking more fresh-faced than her statue would suggest

Ageing gracefully: The Queen's waxwork, left, and right, the monarch last week at the opening of Parliament looking more fresh-faced than her statue would suggest

Ageing gracefully: The Queen's waxwork, left, and right, the monarch last week at the opening of Parliament looking more fresh-faced and with fewer wrinkles than her newly unveiled statue would suggest

Artists spent hours poring over a recent portrait of the Queen that was taken to mark her Jubilee.

The look of the statue was modelled on the portrait, but artists used dozens of other photographs as well as video footage and measurements formerly taken of the monarch in order to create the finished result.

Every hair on the Queen's head will have been added individually by hand, and every detail of her hair and make up recreated by a team of perfectionist artists.

Her clothing and jewellery has been faithfully recreated – the dress encrusted with 53,000 Swarovski Elements crystals – and her blue silk sash an exact replica, adorned with The Queen's Garter Badge and topped off with a copy of the diamond and pearl George IV State Diadem.

Her pose and gesture, settled on after hours of research, ensure that the resulting waxwork appears natural and instantly familiar.

Principal Sculptor, Steve Swales, who created the Queen's previous figure and attended a sitting at Buckingham Palace in 2001, commented: 'It is extremely exciting to create a wax figure of Queen Elizabeth II and understandably rather nerve-racking too.

Attention to detail: Every hair on the Queen's head was applied individually, by hand, to create the natural finish

The Queen's waxwork can be found in the Royal room alongside Prince Philip and the other members of the Royal family, including the recently revealed statues of William and Kate

Attention to detail: Every hair on the Queen's head was applied individually by hand to create the natural finish

Uncanny: Tussauds employee Lisa Burton puts the finishing touches to the Queen's statue today

Uncanny: Tussauds employee Lisa Burton puts the finishing touches to the Queen's statue today

Crowning glory: Tussauds' Keeley Scothern adjusts the monarch's jewels ahead of the big reveal

Crowning glory: Tussauds' Keeley Scothern adjusts the Monarch's jewels ahead of the big reveal

'Meeting the Queen at our last sitting was an invaluable help in creating this figure.

'She was very relaxed and warm and
I’ve tried to portray that, whilst maintaining a sense of majesty. Her
expression is soft, as if she is just about to break into a smile. I
hope she approves of the end result.'

Buckingham Palace was involved during the creative process of this new figure, with images of the clay head sent to the Palace.

'We have a had a close relationship
with the British Royal family since Madame Tussauds first opened its
doors in Baker Street in 1884 and it has grown in strength ever since,'
remarked Liz Edwards, PR Manager at the attraction.

'We have created more figures of Queen
Elizabeth II than anyone else in Madame Tussauds’ history, with the
first figure created when she was just two years old. In such an iconic
year for The Queen we are thrilled to welcome this new figure to the
attraction and we are sure our guests will be excited to get a closer
look at our beloved Monarch'.

It can be found in the Royal area alongside her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Harry and new
figures of her Prince William and his wife the Duchess of Cambridge that were revealed last month.

Inspiration: The official Diamond Jubilee portrait by John Swannell that Tussauds used to recreate the Queen's likeness

Inspiration: The official Diamond Jubilee portrait by John Swannell that Tussauds used to recreate the Queen's likeness


The Queen's new waxwork at Madame Tussauds ahead of Diamond Jubilee

Royal makeover: A sculptor working on the Queen's Diamond Jubilee waxwork, which was unveiled today

Business as usual: Prince Philip attended the final day of the Windsor Horse Show in the grounds of Windsor castle yesterday

Business as usual: Prince Philip attended the final day of the Windsor Horse Show in the grounds of Windsor castle yesterday

Business as usual: Prince Philip attended the final day of the Windsor Horse Show in the grounds of Windsor castle yesterday

Royal show: Prince Philip looked in high spirits as he enjoyed the day's events

Flattering likeness: As Prince Philip's Tussauds waxwork has yet to be updated, his statue now looks to be several years younger than the Queen's

Flattering likeness: As Prince Philip's Tussauds waxwork has yet to be updated, his statue now looks to be several years younger than the Queen's

Flattering likeness: As his waxwork has yet to be updated, the statue of Prince Philip, pictured today age 90, now looks to be several years younger than the Queen's

ROYAL WAXWORKS OVER THE YEARS

Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Princess Anne (Princess Royal) and Prince Charles waxworks at Madame Tussauds pictured in 1952

Waxworks Statues & Sculptures of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussaud's in London, 1956

LEFT: Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Princess Anne (Princess Royal) and Prince Charles waxworks at Madame Tussauds pictured in 1952

RIGHT: Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussauds in 1956

Prince Charles and Queen Elizabeth II waxworks at Madame Tussauds in 1969

Waxwork of the Queen at Madame Tussaud's 1977

LEFT: Prince Charles and Queen Elizabeth II waxworks at Madame Tussauds in 1969

RIGHT: Queen Elizabeth II in 1977

Waxworks Statues & Sculptures of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussaud's in London, 1985

New waxwork of Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussaud's in London 2002

LEFT: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussaud's in 1985

RIGHT: The most recent waxwork of Queen Elizabeth II at Madame Tussaud's in 2002 to mark her Golden Jubilee

DM.has('rcpv1638043084001','BCVideo');