Pyjamas in the classroom? Retailers rush out sleepwear to cash in on teen demand for extreme dressed-down look

Pyjamas in the classroom Retailers rush out sleepwear to cash in on teen demand for extreme dressed-down look

Those who work from home are lucky enough to spend the day in their pyjamas but for teenagers, it seems, it is now acceptable attire for wearing out in public.

The popularity of students' dressed-down look, incorporating pyjamas, sweatpants and slippers, has
raised more than a few eyebrows among adults who see it as symptomatic
of complacency and slothfulness.

Retailers, however, are cashing in, launching extensive collections of loungewear to cater to this growing market.

Lounging around: The popularity of sleepwear as everyday casual attire among teenagers has become a cause for concern for many adults

Lounging around: The popularity of sleepwear as everyday casual attire among teenagers has become a cause for concern for many adults

Casualwear brands targeted at young
adults such as Hollister, American Eagle and Victoria's Secret Pink, all carry extensive selections well beyond the average sleepwear offering.

The range of different products includes leggings, stretch sweatpants for 'yoga' and camisoles.

Chief
merchandising officer of American Eagle, Jennifer Foyle, says the
wide-neck T-shirts are proving particularly popular because 'girls are wanting to show
their bra straps.'

But many believe high schoolers have taken the casual style a step too far.

David Beriau, dean of students at Mount
Anthony Union High School, in Bennington, Vermont, has banned students from wearing pyjamas and slippers to class.

Pajamas for teens

Pajamas for teens

Cashing in: Victoria's Secret is selling pyjama sets with T-shirt tops (left) while American Eagle styles its fleece 'lounge pants' with flip flops (right)

He told the Wall Street Journal: 'If you
come to school like you're going to go to bed, it says a lot about your
lack of motivation.

'It creates an atmosphere where people feel like, “The next thing I'm going to do is slouch. And why not nod off”'

Some disciplinarians are so upset by seeing youngsters dressed this way, they want to enforce a law to prevent it.

Michael
Williams, a commissioner in Louisiana’s Caddo Parish told the paper: 'The moral fiber in America is dwindling away.

'It's pajamas today; what is it going to be tomorrow Walking around in your underwear'

Comfortable: A Jenni pajama set with printed leggings, on sale at Macy's, is a classic example of how teen brands are adapting to the market

Comfortable: A Jenni pajama set with printed leggings, on sale at Macy's, is a classic example of how teen brands are adapting to the market

They may have a battle on their hands, though. Teens are unlikely to give up their comfort without a fight.

Thirteen-year-old Allison Fell
attested that when she chooses her Kohl sweatpants over a pair of jeans,
'sometimes, it's just because it's kind of my lazy day.'

Cassandra
Gero, a fashion historian at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume
Institute spoke to Slate about why she believes the trend is so
controversial.

'The
point of getting dressed in the morning—the purpose of fashion—is to
attract a mate, display your wealth, and to express yourself,' she
explained.

'If you
don’t do that, you’re telling the world you can’t be bothered to conform
to the most minimal strictures of society. That’s why people get so
upset about daytime pajamas: They want you to care.'