Only half of America"s first marriages make it past two decades

To have and to hold… for 20 years at the most Only half of America's first marriages make it past two decades

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UPDATED:

20:59 GMT, 26 March 2012

More couples may be moving in together before they tie
the knot, but new research has showed that about half of America’s first-time wedded couples
stay together past their 20th anniversary.

A survey conducted by the National Health Statistics Report
showed that a decreasing number of women, compared to previous years, were still
married for the first time between 2006 and 2010.

But while newly married couples may lack staying power, the
research, which saw a group of 12,279 women and 10,403 men aged between 15 and
44 interviewed, also showed an increase in unmarried women who were living with
their romantic partner.

I do, for now: About 50per cent of American couples stay together past their 20 year anniversary while more unmarried couples are moving in together

I do, for now: About 50per cent of American couples stay together past their 20 year anniversary while more unmarried couples are moving in together

The tally jumped from three per cent to 11per cent since 1982.

Results were drawn from a survey of 12,279 women and 10,403
men aged between 15 and 44.

The same survey also took place in 1973, 1976,
1982, 1988, 1995 and 2002.

Interestingly, the survey also showed that the average age
of first-time brides, which is 26 years-old, has increased over the years. It has also
increased for grooms, who are now marrying at 28 years-old on average.

The research provides some sort of guidance for
couples who hope to lengthen their first marriage as much as possible.

First-time teenage
brides and grooms were less likely to reach the 20-year mark when compared with
people who married when they were 20 or over.

And ten years, as opposed to 20 years, seems to be much more manageable
when it comes to marriage. The research found that an improved 68per cent of
women and 70per cent of men reached the ten-year milestone.

Royal union: Prince William and Kate Middleton were 28 and 29, respectively, when they married in 2011. Their odds are better than those of teen newlyweds

Royal union: Prince William and Kate Middleton were 28 and 29, respectively, when they married in 2011. Their odds are better than those of teen newlyweds

Several factors were considered during the research. Women
who were raised in ‘other religions’ were found to have the most long-lasting
marriages. They have a 65per cent chance of lasting past 20 years.

The group was
followed by Catholic-raised women, who were found to have a 53per cent chance. Protestant women were found to have a 50per cent chance and finally, women with no religious affiliation who
were found to have a 43per cent chance.

Education played its part also. The survey showed that women
and men who obtained at least a bachelor’s degree were more likely to have a
long-lasting marriage.

Also, those without children who go into their first
marriage are more likely to make it last than those already with children.