One in three British women have no plan to start on a family and prefer to get a well-paid job

One in three British women have no plan to start on a family and prefer to get a well-paid job

54% of Brits view marriage as an important milestone

Age of marriage risen from 26 to 30

Average age of first time mothers risen from 24 to 28

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UPDATED:

13:12 GMT, 19 October 2012

A third of British women now have no plans to start a family and would rather focus on gaining a well-paid job, a new study reveals.

This view is seemingly shared by mainstream celebrities such as Helen Mirren, Jennifer Aniston and Cameron Diaz, all of whom are 40 plus and have avoided parenthood.

It appears in this day and age people prioritise having a secure job and retaining independence above having children.

According to the research, a third of women would rather focus on their job than starting a family

According to the research, a third of women would rather focus on their job than starting a family

According to the research, a third of women would rather focus on their job than starting a family

The numbers of those getting married is dwindling, and just 54 per cent of Brits still view it as an important milestone in life.

The age people decide to tie the knot has also changed in the last 20 years, going from 26 in 1991 to 30 in 2008 for brides.

This shift was highlighted when the Duchess of Cambridge was seen as ‘old’ when she married Prince William at the age of 29 last year.

The study, by insurance providers Direct Line, also revealed the age of first time mothers has risen steadily in the last 30 years.

While in 1974 the average age of first time mums was 24, the age in 2010 was four years older at 28.

Dame Helen Mirren and Cameron Diaz are leading the trend of women in no rush to start a family

Dame Helen Mirren and Cameron Diaz are leading the trend of women in no rush to start a family

Dame Helen Mirren and Cameron Diaz are leading the trend of women in no rush to start a family

Despite this, it seems the ages of grandparents and great grandparents have become lower – 50 per cent of people now becoming grandparents before they reach 65.

Celebs fitting in to this category include television host Sharon Osbourne, 60, and actor Tom Hanks, 56.

Meanwhile, half of us will also now become great grandparents at some point in their lifetime.

Kerry Chilvers, of Direct Line, said: 'Our research has shown what is important to us, and when we achieve these things, is shifting with time.

Duchess of Cambridge was seen as 'old' when she married Prince William at the age of 29 last year

Duchess of Cambridge was seen as 'old' when she married Prince William at the age of 29 last year

'The inconvenience linked with unwanted interruptions and subsequent loss of time is shown to be a major concern.'

Accountant Jane Bush, 42, from Southampton, Hants, said: 'Despite my friends all having kids, being a mum has never really interested me.

'I have a great job and would rather focus on my career at the moment and continue to enjoy my independence.

'I’ve always thought, “perhaps one day I will have a child”, but realistically I expect it will not happen and I don’t think I’ll regret it.'