No white dress, no forced smiles and DEFINITELY no in-laws: The rise of the morning-after-the-wedding album

No white dress, no forced smiles and DEFINITELY no in-laws: The rise of the morning-after-the-wedding album

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UPDATED:

12:13 GMT, 24 August 2012

Wedding albums usually involve group photos with various combinations of the bride and groom's family. But a new photography trend is doing away with all that, and instead taking a far more intimate approach.

Photographers such as Melissa Squires and Michelle Jonn have noticed demand for morning-after-the-wedding photos, recording a couple's first morning as man and wife.

While many newlyweds might consider it a very private time – and, indeed, a chance to recover from the excesses of the night before – some are now inviting photographers to capture the scene.

Morning after the night before: A number of photographers are now specialising in creating albums that record a couple's first full day as man and wife

Morning after the night before: A number of brides and grooms, such as Inna Shamis and her new husband, pictured, are now commissioning albums that record their first full day as man and wife

Special time: The couple explained that they wanted memories of the day. 'When you get married, you're in the best shape of your life,' Mrs Shamis said

Special time: The couple explained that they wanted memories of the day. 'When you get married, you're in the best shape of your life,' Mrs Shamis said

Ms Jonn of New Jersey-based Femme Fatale, charges around $650 for the service and has captured just-married couples in various states of undress, in the shower and even in bed, surrounded by rumpled sheets.

She told MailOnline: 'Who says couples can't have amazing images of themselves. It's not just for celebrities.'

Ms Squires, who is behind the Detroit-based company, A Girl in Love, also shoots morning-after-the-wedding albums. But
newlywed bliss is the feeling she aims to capture, not raunchy sex
scenes.

'The feeling I try to capture is closeness,' she told the New York Daily News. 'That lovely
calm and happiness one feels when they realize it’s for real, now they
are really husband and wife.'

Ms Jonn's approach is completely different, and far more fashion-led.

Melissa Squires

Wedded bliss: Melissa Squires, who is behind the Detroit-based company, A Girl in Love, aims to capture the closeness of a newlywed couple, and steers clear of raunchy sex scenes

For one client, Inna Shamis, the shoot was inspired by the Emporio Armani fashion campaign starring
David and Victoria Beckham.

'I love
fashion photography so I'm trying to bring that with fashion and
photojournalism to couples,' the photographer explained.

Mrs Shamis, a PR executive, 38, thinks the morning-after shoot concept is inspired.

Melissa Squires

Peaceful: One couple shot by Ms Squires are seen enjoying the morning quiet after the night before

Melissa Squires

Down time: The pair relax in what appears to be a luxury hotel room in their pyjamas

She and her new husband even posed for Ms Jonn in the shower, recreating that famous Titanic scene with a hand on the steamy glass.

'When you get married, you’re in the best shape of your life and why not have these memories,' she told the Daily News.

And it seems it was a fun experience, too.

'As the day progressed, we established this fantastic chemistry with [Ms Jonn],' she added.

Racy: Some of the images are reminiscent of 'mommy porn' bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey

Racy: Some of the images are reminiscent of 'mommy porn' bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey

Honeymoon period: Mr and Mrs Shamis were so delighted by the photos, they posted them on Facebook

Honeymoon period: Mr and Mrs Shamis were so delighted with the photos, they posted them on Facebook

First morning as man and wife: The couple, from New Jersey, want to treasure memories of the day forever

First morning as man and wife: The couple, from New Jersey, want to treasure memories of the day forever

The couple were so delighted with the
results of the shoot, they posted the photos on Facebook, and say they
will even share them with their future children – when they are old
enough.

'I wouldn’t show this to them at the age of ten,' Mrs Shamis said. 'But when
they’re older and can understand it. It’s their parents looking artistic… not at all pornography.'