No more working-mom guilt? Eight out of ten mothers enjoy having a career and feel it sets a good example to their children

No more working-mom guilt Eight out of ten mothers enjoy having a career and feel it sets a good example to their children

Long has the debate raged over whether being a working mum is a help or a hindrance to a child's upbringing.

A new study suggests that mothers in full time work need not feel guilty about having a career as well as children, in fact actively benefiting from the lifestyle.

Care.com surveyed 1,000 working mothers across the U.S. and found that more mothers than ever were enjoying maintaining a career in addition to raising a family.

Work/life balance: Eight out of ten working mothers enjoy being a working parent and 64 per cent of said that work did not affect their ability to be a good mother

Work/life balance: Eight out of ten working mothers enjoy being a working parent and 64 per cent of said that work did not affect their ability to be a good mother

64 per cent of the women said that work has no bearing on their ability to be a good mother and half said that they feel that having a job makes them a good role model for their children.

An overwhelming majority – eight out of ten – reported enjoying being a working parent.

Sheila Marcelo, CEO of Care.com, is encouraged by the results. 'Most indicated they love being a great role model for their children, feel more creative and motivated as a working-parent, and even feel they add a better perspective at their jobs now that they are moms,' she wrote at the site.

TodayMoms said the results suggest that women – the more guilt ridden of the sexes because of their nurturing tendencies – are starting to feel less guilty about wanting both a career and children.

Being a good mom is not about giving all of your time to your child said Dr Robi Ludwig, who explained to the programme that moms must take care of themselves first. 'A happy mom has a better chance of being a good mom', she said.

The survey also indicates that while finding a balance between work, family and relationships is not easy, it is possible.

Breaking the care.com results down, there is clearly a divide between home and work when it comes to juggling responsibilities.

'Professional aspirations aren't being abandoned for raising a child. Families are supporting each other'

89 per cent of moms in dual-income households said they feel supported in their career goals by their partner, but workplaces are less understanding.

40 per cent of the respondents said that they have felt judged for being a working parent.

A massive 73 per cent of the women do not have child care benefits at their jobs.

36 per cent feel that family impedes their ability to advance in their careers and 56 per cent said that professional development is affected by family time.

She implores working mothers who feel under-supported at work to appeal to HR departments to hep employers to realise the benefits of their added skills.

'The reality is that this survey shows that working moms are seeing themselves as mothers who work – not as working moms – and that they not only have ambitions, but find that they are better contributors in the workplace because they are moms,' writes Ms Marcelo.

'Professional aspirations aren't being abandoned for raising a child. Families are supporting each other – it's the workplace that needs to catch up.'