Mumpreneurs invent light up potty to help children use the loo in the night


Mumpreneurs invent light up potty to help children use the loo in the night

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UPDATED:

12:56 GMT, 4 May 2012

Two enterprising mothers have been busy celebrating their first invention – a light up potty.

Kerry Marriott, 35, and Rachael Forder, 40, from Southsea, Hampshire, came up with the idea when they realised their own youngsters were finding it difficult to locate the toilet in the dark.

The pair hope their LumiPotti, which illuminates when movement is detected, will go on sale in December priced at around 16.

Rachael Forder (left) and Kerry Marriott with their LumiPotti which is designed to help children find their potty in the dark

Rachael Forder (left) and Kerry Marriott with their LumiPotti which is designed to help children find their potty in the dark

Before the patented concept goes to market the women are recruiting toddlers to give the potty a trial run.

Explaining their eureka moment Mrs Marriott, mother to Hollie,5, and 18-month-old Rowan, said: 'We both potty trained our children in a similar way.

'Rachael used a transparent potty with a night light underneath and I plugged a night light in to the wall nearby.

'Our
children liked the idea that they could get up and find the potty on
their own at night. They were quite proud of themselves.

“It wasn’t
100 per cent fool proof but it proved really effective. We started
telling other parents about the method and they said it had worked for
them.

The loo has a built-in motion sensor which triggers a night light when activated

The loo has a built-in motion sensor which triggers a night light when activated

'We were laughing about it one day, joking like mums do and
saying ‘why doesn’t someone make something like this’ It went from
there.'

The friends sat on the idea for two years before investigating whether anything similar was already available.

But when they realised their product was unique, they began working on a design.

They
estimate that if it is successful, it could save parents up to half a
tonne of disposable night-time nappies in just six months and allow for a better night's sleep.

Mrs
Marriott, added: 'Toilet training is this immensely fraught time for
parents, especially if you’re a new parent because you have no idea what
to expect.

'You know there’s going to be endless traipsing to the potty.

'You’ve probably only just got your sleep back and now you know your night is going to be broken again.'

Mrs Marriott and engineer Miss Forder, who is
due to give birth to her second child in two weeks, plan to sell the
finished model later this year.