Mother with breast cancer forced to leave roller rink because she was wearing a hat

'I didn't want to be bald in front of everyone': Mother with breast cancer forced to leave roller rink because she was wearing a hatJanna Lombardo from South Windsor,
Connecticut, was told that her hat broke the Ron-A-Roll dress code policyThe mother wasn't skating and was watching her children from the sidelines

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UPDATED:

16:15 GMT, 9 October 2012

A mother suffering from hair loss due to chemotherapy, has told how she was forced to leave a skating rink because her hat broke its dress code policy.

Janna Lombardo from South Windsor, Connecticut, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006, took her children for a roller session at Ron-A-Roll.

But despite watching her family from the sidelines, she was instructed by staff to wear a helmet or leave.

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Outraged: Chemotherapy patient Janna Lombardo was forced to leave a skating center because she refused to remove a hat covering her hair loss

Outraged: Chemotherapy patient Janna Lombardo was forced to leave a skating center because she refused to remove a hat covering her hair loss

Ms Lombardo, who is undergoing her second round of chemotherapy, told Fox CT: 'I wasn't going to be on the rink I told them I was going to sit in the snack bar.

'I didn’t want to be bald in front of everybody. I explained to
them that I wasn’t wearing it for fashion that it was because I was on
chemo, and they told me that I couldn’t go in or I could wear a helmet.'

Family day out: Ms Lombardo took her children to the local skating center but decided to leave early when she was asked to remove her head covering and wear a helmet

Family day out: Ms Lombardo took her children to the local skating center but decided to leave early when she was asked to remove her head covering and wear a helmet

Hats off: According to owners of the skating center in Vernon, the policy is about safety

Hats off: According to owners of the skating center in Vernon, the policy is about safety

According to owners of the skating
center in her nearby town of Vernon, the 'no hats, no headwear, no
exceptions' policy is about safety and not about a lack of compassion
for cancer patients.

Warning signs: Posters in the skating venue clearly state the dress code policy

Warning signs: Posters in the skating venue clearly state the dress code policy

The website clearly states that 'no hats
or headwear of any kind including sunglasses, combs worn in the hair,
handkerchiefs, head wraps, sweat bands' are permitted.

Ms Lombardo's friend Susan Morison said she was 'appalled' by the incident.

Describing the course of events, she said: 'She took her hat off, and she pulled out a clump of hair and this didn’t
affect him emotionally in any way.

'I was appalled because it’s just a
basic human kindness to let somebody do what they need to do, to keep
their dignity.'

According to a friend of the owner, the family were given a full refund.

Fox TV reports that it is not the first time Ron-A-Roll's 'no hat' policy has been questioned.

in 2010 another chemo patient was asked to remove headgear and the same year a Muslim woman was instructed to remove her headscarf.

The company did not respond to requests seeking comment.