Mother left with facial paralysis after shock brain bleed tells how she now feels MORE beautiful than ever before


Mother left with facial paralysis after shock brain bleed tells how she now feels MORE beautiful than ever before

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UPDATED:

22:03 GMT, 27 April 2012

A 29-year-old woman who suffered from an unexpected brain bleed six years ago has written a book about the severe physiological impact it has had on her self image.

Louise Krug, who was left with a crossed eye, partially-paralysed face and dragging foot after the incident, has penned the new book Louise: Amended.

It is a story that explores how a dramatic change in the Kansas teacher's physical appearance sparked her positive new outlook on life.

Beauty: Louise Krug, a 29-year-old author and teacher pictured above, suffered from a shock brain bleed six years ago. It has led to an improvement to her self image. The left side of her face is paralysed

Beauty: Louise Krug, a 29-year-old author and teacher pictured above, suffered from a shock brain bleed six years ago. It has led to an improvement to her self image. She has written a book about the ordeal

Mrs Krug, who is now married to Nick Krug with whom they share six-month-old Olive, had been pursuing a career as a celebrity and lifestyle journalist when the life-altering incident occurred.

The brain bleed, sparked by a burst blood vessel, caused her to faint at a Santa Barbara Film Festival premiere she had attended with Claude, her boyfriend at the time.

Mrs Krug visited the emergency room later that evening after the severe numbness, which made her right foot lag behind her as she walked, headaches, double vision and vertigo she could not shake off suggested something serious had happened.

A doctor later told her that a cavernous angioma, which is a malformed blood vessel, in her brain had burst and bled out.

Career woman: She had been chasing a career as a celebrity and lifestyle journalist when the incident occured

Career woman: She had been chasing a career as a celebrity and lifestyle journalist when the incident occured

Despite various surgical attempts to straighten a wandering left eye and restore movement to the left side of her face, she is unable to move any of it at all.

As she is unable to blink or close her left eye, her eyelid was sewn partially shut in order to keep the cornea damp. A pair of specially-made sunglasses have been altered for Mrs Krug and she wears them to help correct her double vision.

Even still, she has shown an optimistic attitude since the incident. It tends to surprise many people who learn of her experiences.

She told LJWorld.com, a newspaper where her husband is employed: 'All of this stuff [corrective surgery] never works as well as expected, but it did make things better.'

Bliss: She is now married to Nick Krug and the couple share a six-month old daughter named Olive

Bliss: She is now married to Nick Krug and the couple share a six-month old daughter named Olive

New life: The new mother has said she still has 'the feeling of beauty' and that it nothing to do with perfection

New life: The new mother has said she still has 'the feeling of beauty' and that it nothing to do with perfection

Mrs Krug admitted, however, that she could not help but feel utterly helpless at the time.

She told the Huffington Post: 'In an instant, my looks were gone. I couldn't help but wonder who I was.'

Remembering: She has penned a book about her experiences (above) titled Louise: Amended

Remembering: She has penned a book about her experiences (above) titled Louise: Amended

Claude, her ex-boyfriend who had been living with Mrs Krug in Los Angeles at the time of the incident, dumped her after telling her that her mouth felt 'strange to kiss.'

His hopes of getting her 'back to normal in no time' were also left unanswered.

Six years on, Mrs Krug has developed a tough fighting spirit as she grows more and more comfortable with her appearance.

She said: 'If I hear that beauty is only skin-deep one more time, especially from an attractive person, I might lose it.

'I still have the feeling of beauty. The feeling of beauty has nothing to do with perfection. It is about self-respect. It is about caring for oneself.

'Being careless never felt right.'

She began writing her book, which is 192-pages long, three years ago as part of her thesis for a master's degree in fine arts.

One section of the book reads: 'I will not be talked into smiling for pictures – the asymmetry is too awful. The only way I tolerate being in a photo is wearing my sunglasses, staring expressionlessly at the camera, my mouth a straight line, waiting for it all to be over.'

While it may sound like an extremely sad account, Mrs Krug said this passage is not intended to reflect the seemingly negative way in which she views her face. It is simply an indication of her self acceptance.

'I lay it all out there,' she said.

'I include a lot of potentially embarrassing stuff about myself and I don't cast myself in the most flattering light, so I hope people don't misunderstand what I'm trying to say.'