Morality? It means taking care of family say half of 16 to 24 year-olds

Morality It means taking care of family say half of 16 to 24 year-olds

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UPDATED:

23:08 GMT, 12 September 2012

Young people think morality means looking after your family rather than taking part in religion, a survey has shown.

And more than half (51 per cent) of the 16 to 24-year- olds questioned in the poll said their peers were less concerned about morals than their parents’ generation.

Asked what they thought was the most important moral issue from a list of eight, 59 per cent said ‘looking after family’.

Family comes first: Young people think morality means looking after your family

Family comes first: Young people think morality means looking after your family

Just over one in ten (12 per cent) chose ‘putting others first’, 8 per cent said ‘being faithful to a partner’, and just 4 per cent opted for ‘having religious faith or beliefs’.

The other options were caring for the environment, paying taxes, playing a part in the local community and buying ethical products.

The poll, commissioned by BBC Religion and Ethics for the BBC Re:Think Festival in Salford, also asked the 585 young people to rank the eight issues in order of importance, with religious belief voted the one that mattered the least (32 per cent).

The survey found that more than a quarter of the youngsters (27 per cent) believed that as long as businesses were not breaking the law, they should not concern themselves with ethical issues, although 64 per cent thought that they should.

Religious belief mattered least among those that took part in a BBC survey

Religious belief mattered least among those that took part in a BBC survey

Seven out of ten Britons get together with their extended family only at weddings and funerals, it was revealed yesterday.

The findings emerged in a study of 2,000 adults, which showed many of us go for years without meeting up with aunts, uncles and cousins.

One third of Britons admit they have lost touch with many of their relatives, while one in 20 said they had severed ties because they ‘just don’t like them very much’.

Three quarters of those polled in the survey for a drinks firm have members of their extended family – such as newly born nephews and cousins who have got married – who they haven’t even met.

Two thirds confessed they would struggle to name some of their relatives.