London Fashion Week: Peta protestors dressed in LBDs parade dead, skinned foxes on Bond Street

Here is the rest of your fur coat: Peta protestors dressed in LBDs parade dead, skinned foxes on Bond Street on the eve of London Fashion Week

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UPDATED:

17:19 GMT, 13 September 2012

Models causing a stir at London Fashion Week is nothing new.

But these three women want to turn stomachs – as well as heads – with their chilling message to the fashion pack.

Dressed in LBDs and klller heels the
group strutted down Bond Street holding two dead skinned foxes on behalf
of animal rights organisation PETA, who want the use of animal fur
banned in the fashion industry.

Killer fashion: PETA are using London Fashion Week as an opportunity to highlight the cruel fur trade

Killer fashion: PETA are using London Fashion Week as an opportunity to highlight the cruel fur trade

PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) is renowned for using fashion week as a platform for raising awareness of its anti-fur policy and protesting against designers such as Julien MacDonald and Burberry who use fur in their collections.

In previous years the organisation has invaded the catwalk, asked celebrities to strip and paraded TV screens showing harrowing footage of animals being skinned alive for their pelts, but this is the first time that they have used dead animals in their activities.

Bond Street is one of London's busiest and most exclusive shopping areas, home to lots of high end designer brands.

As well as the two animal corpses the models carried a sign that read simply: 'Here's the rest of your fur coat.'

PETA Senior Programmes Manager Yvonne Taylor told the MailOnline: 'Fashion is meant to be fun, but there's nothing fun about driving animals insane from a lifetime of confinement and then skinning them for their fur,'

PETA hail designers Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and Vivienne Westwood as examples of sucessful fashion businesses that have publicly sworn off using fur.

'With so many stylish alternatives to fur available, there's no excuse to harm a hair on a fox's back.'

The dead foxes were donated by The Fox project, a charity dedicated to the protection, rescue and advocacy of the wild fox.