Lady Gaga changes song lyrics in support of fashion designers as they wage war with top style critic Cathy Horyn

Lady Gaga changes song lyrics in support of fashion designers as they wage war with top style critic Cathy Horyn

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UPDATED:

21:21 GMT, 3 October 2012

Lady Gaga has decided to add more fuel to a complicated and fierce fashion fight between The New York Times style critic Cathy Horyn and fashion designers Oscar de la Renta and Hedi Slimane.

The music idol preformed a rap redux of her single 'Cake Like Lady Gaga' at Thierry Mugler’s recent spring 2013 show in Paris, using the opportunity to attack Ms Horyn and her longtime partner, Art Ortenberg.

With her voice distorted to sound male, she rapped: 'Ortenberg you can suck my d**k, walk
b***h you ain't Lady Gaga… Cathy Horyn your style ain't d**k. Walk a mile in these foot-high
heels, I run in these you ain't running s**t. You chew beef, I wear meat
– I'm getting fat and so is my bank. From a sold-out world tour,
b***h.'

Feuding fashionistas: Lady Gaga (pictured yesterday with Dontella Versace) added more fuel to a complicated fight between The New York Times style critic Cathy Horyn and fashion designers Oscar de la Renta and Hedi Slimane

Feuding fashionistas: Lady Gaga (pictured yesterday with Dontella Versace) added more fuel to a complicated fight between style critic Cathy Horyn and fashion designers Oscar de la Renta and Hedi Slimane

The fight, which began last year but was revived during the current spring/summer 2013 shows in New York and Paris, first encompassed Dontella Versace, Gaga and Ms Horyn.

It has since grown to include Oscar de la Renta and now, the new designer of Yves Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane.

In 2011, Ms Horyn criticized Versace for outfitting Gaga in archival vintage pieces for the singer's Edge of Glory video.

'Be choosier, Ms Versace,' she wrote in a piece for The New York Times, announcing she had 'unfollowed' the singer on Twitter.

Gaga used her V magazine column to
respond, writing: 'In the age of the internet, when collections and
performances are so accessible to the public and anyone can post a
review on Facebook or Twitter, shouldn't columnists and reviewers, such
as Cathy Horyn, employ a more modern and forward approach to criticism,
one that separates them from the average individual at home on their
laptop'

Complicated: Cathy Horyn, a respected New York Times fashion critic, has been publicly attacked by designers for her reviews of their most recent shows

Complicated: Cathy Horyn, The New York Times style critic, has been publicly attacked by Lady Gaga and fashion designers after she reviewed their shows

The feud was reignited during New York Fashion Week in September when Oscar de la Renta misunderstood a line in Ms Horyn's largely positive
review of his spring collection, specifically misinterpreting her use of the slang term 'hot dog,' which, as a verb, means showboater.

Gaga took the designer's side on Twitter, after he bought a full page ad in Women’s Wear Daily voicing his dislike for her review, asking why he shouldn't in turn call Ms Horyn a 'stale, three-day-old hamburger.'

Gaga then tweeted: 'Bravo Oscar. Only you would be so chic as to purchase an
entire page in WWD, making statements like a good fashion citizen.'

And from there, everything deteriorated.

Mr Ortenberg, coming to the defense of his girlfriend, wrote a letter to the editor of Women's Wear Daily, calling Gaga 'vacuous,' while advising her to 'grow up'.

Referencing her earlier V magazine column against Ms Horyn, who critiques collections for a living, Mr Ortenberg wrote: 'I feel it necessary to cudgel Gaga for her… dumbing-down opinion that an uninformed opinion is as valid as that of a seasoned critic – as though Gaga and Bridget Foley of WWD or David Denby of The New Yorker or Ben Brantley of The New York Times or Brooks Atkinson or Pauline Kael or any professional critic is just another opinion and that Gaga's vacuous thoughts deserve the same status.'

Now, after Gaga's last word in rap form at the
Mugler show, and in the spirit of timeliness, designer Hedi Slimane has
joined in the war of words and media go-betweens.

After he barred the fashion critic from his Paris runway debut for Saint Laurent on
Monday, Ms Horyn posted a review of the show based solely on digital images.

In her review, written for The New York Times' On the Runway blog, she concluded that the collection was 'a nice
but frozen vision of a bohemian chick at the Chateau Marmont. Or in St.
Tropez.

'Mr. Slimane’s clothes lacked a new
fashion spirit,' she wrote of the former Dior Homme designer.
'Considering that Mr. Slimane was an avatar of youthful style, I
expected more from this debut.

'Meanwhile, its competitors – Balenciaga, Dior, Givenchy, Celine, Lanvin – are having a terrific season,' she added.

Missives of mischief: Oscar de la Renta (left) and new Yves Saint Laurent designer Hedi Slimane (right) both sent open letters to Ms Horyn after they were displeased with her reviews of their shows

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Missives of mischief: Oscar de la Renta (left) and new Yves Saint Laurent designer Hedi Slimane (right) both sent open letters to Ms Horyn after they were displeased with her critical reviews of their shows

She also revealed Mr Slimane's reasons for not inviting her. (Business of Fashion editor Imran Amed was also banned from the show, he was told, because Yves Saint Laurent was unhappy with his 'tone of voice' when writing about the brand.)

Ms Horyn explained: '[He] objected bitterly to a review I wrote in 2004 – not about him but Raf Simons.

'I wrote that without Mr. Simons’ template of slim tailoring and street casting, there would not have been a Hedi Slimane – just as there would never have been a Raf Simons without Helmut Lang. Fashion develops a bit like a genetic line.

'Anyway,' she continued of the
designer who hasn't spoken to her in five years, 'Mr. Slimane insisted
that he was the first to show the skinny suit. It was a silly debate.
Who cares As time went on, he also felt (as best as I can tell) that I gave preference to Mr Simons in my coverage of the men’s shows'.

Indeed, Ms Horyn has made no secret of her fandom for Mr Simons' designs, and after he spent seven years at the design helm of Jil Sander, her glowing review of his debut ready-to-wear collection for Dior just days earlier is a clear reference.

Open tweet: New designer for Yves Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane, posted this letter on Twitter in which he calls Ms Horyn, 'a schoolyard bully and also a little bit of a stand-up comedian'

Open tweet: New designer for Yves Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane, posted this letter on Twitter in which he calls Ms Horyn, 'a schoolyard bully and also a little bit of a stand-up comedian'

Dear Cathy: Oscar de la Renta bought a full page ad in WWD after he misunderstood a line in Ms Horyn's largely positive review of his spring collection, specifically misinterpreting her use of the slang term 'hot dog'

Dear Cathy: Oscar de la Renta bought a full page ad in WWD after he misunderstood a line in Ms Horyn's largely positive review of his spring collection, specifically misinterpreting her use of the slang term 'hot dog'

However, it was, and has always been, a deserved opinion – and one in the same line of thinking as countless editors, stylists and women in general, who genuinely smiled as Mr Simons sent one Dior look out after another.

However an unimpressed Mr Slimane thought otherwise. Later in the day, after her review had been uploaded, the designer posted a letter on Twitter in which he called Ms Horyn, 'a schoolyard bully and also a little bit of a stand-up comedian.'

'As far as I’m concerned, she will never get a seat at Saint Laurent, but might get 2-for-1 at Dior,' he continued, after attacking her physical appearance. 'I don’t mind critics, but they have to come from a fashion critic, not a publicist in disguise. I am quite mesmerized she did get away with it for so many years.'

Yet to publicly address Mr Slimane's message or Gaga's attack, when she was reached for comment last night, Ms Horyn told Women's Wear Daily, 'It’s just silly nonsense to me.'