Kate Middleton and Prince William "so sad" after teenagers they met on cancer ward die


Kate and Wills 'so sad' after two teenagers they met on cancer ward died within days of each otherAmanda Slann's mother said: 'Rubbing shoulders with royalty was the highlight of her life'

Two brave teenagers who touched the
hearts of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge during a hospital visit last
year have lost their battles with cancer.

Beth Ansell, 19, and Amanda Slann, 17, who were on the same ward at the Royal Marsden hospital, died within days of each other.

A spokesman for the Royal couple has
said they were 'very saddened' to hear of the deaths of two of the
teenagers they met during last September's visit.

Making an impression: The Duchess of Cambridge with Beth Ansell at the Royal Marsden hospital in September

Making an impression: The Duchess of Cambridge with Beth Ansell at the Royal Marsden hospital in September

Beth was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma in 2010, and Amanda had leukemia.

They met Kate and William in the
chemotherapy room where they posed for photos and chatted about their
lives and their treatment.

Prince William and Kate made the
visit to the Surrey hospital six months ago – almost 30 years after
Princess Diana toured the hospital on her first solo engagement in 1982.

William is president of the Royal
Marsden – the first hospital in the world dedicated to cancer treatment
and research into the causes of the disease.

Tragic loss: Beth was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma in 2010, but had set herself the target of raising 100,000 for charity

Tragic loss: Beth was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma in 2010, but had set herself the target of raising 100,000 for charity

 The Royal Marsden NHS

The Royal Marsden is a cancer centre specialising in diagnosis, treatment, research and education

Moving visit: Kate and William arriving at the Royal Marsden

Moving visit: Kate and William arriving at the Royal Marsden

He took over from his mother, who took on the role in 1989 until her death in 1997.

During the visit, both William and Kate chatted animatedly to the patients in the hospital’s new 18million Oak Centre for Children and Young People.

Amanda’s mother June, 55, from Maidstone, Kent, told the Daily Mirror: 'Amanda was absolutely ecstatic at meeting the Duke and Duchess.

'Rubbing shoulders with royalty was the highlight of her life and it gave her a huge boost.'

Beth, from Portslade, in Brighton, was also pictured chatting to a relaxed-looking Duchess.

Her father, David, was with her when she met the royals.

He said: 'She fought her illness bravely right until the end. The most I will miss about her was the openness we shared and her dry sense of humour. I am very proud of her.'

Beth’s mother, Deena, added: 'No one could have fought harder and went through so much. She was beautiful, brave, loving and my best friend, I was so proud to be her mum.'

Beth had become an ambassador for Teenage Cancer Trust. She had set herself a fundraising target of 10,000.

Her family and friends hope to reach that target in her memory.

The Royal Marsden was founded as the Free Cancer Hospital in 1851 by Dr William Marsden. Marsden, affected by the death of his wife Elizabeth Ann from cancer, resolved to classify tumours, research the causes and find new treatments.

The hospital at first consisted solely of a dispensary, providing palliative drugs, but it allowed William Marsden the opportunity to study and research the disease.

The hospital was granted its Royal Charter of Incorporation by King George V in 1910 and became known as The Cancer Hospital (Free).

This was changed by King Edward VIII to include the word ‘Royal’ and in 1954 the hospital was renamed The Royal Marsden Hospital in recognition of its founder.

Princess Diana is presented with flowers by nurse Jenny Crisswell at Marsden Cancer Hospital during her visit in 1982

Princess Diana is presented with flowers by nurse Jenny Crisswell at Marsden Cancer Hospital during her visit in 1982

Children and staff wait for the couples' arrival

Children and hospital staff gave a warm welcome to the couple during their visit in September

A HEART-FELT THANK YOU: THE DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE VISITS ROYAL WEDDING DRESS-MAKERS

The Duchess of Cambridge has made a low-key visit to the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court Palace to thank them for their hard work on her wedding dress.

The stunning gown was designed, in secret, by Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen. But embroiderers at Hampton Court – who wear gloves so that they do not damage the delicate fabrics – did not know whose dress they were working on until Kate Middleton showed her gown to the world on her wedding day.

Stunning needlework: Kate Middleton shows off her Alexander McQueen wedding dress

Stunning needlework: Kate Middleton shows off her Alexander McQueen wedding dress

The beautiful intricate detailing on the lace sleeves was hand-stitched – using the Carrickmacross lace-making
technique – at Hampton Court. It was designed to represent the whole of the UK, incorporating the rose, thistle, daffodil
and shamrock.

Susan Kay-Williams, the school’s chief executive, told The Telegraph: 'It was lovely to meet the Duchess of Cambridge and to show her what the Royal School of Needlework does.'