Jubilee souvenirs revealed: Gold 495 decorative urn and crown shaped chocolates

Official Diamond Jubilee souvenirs revealed: Gold decorative urn will set you back 495

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UPDATED:

18:25 GMT, 16 April 2012

For those who really want to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee in style, a new range of souvenirs has been brought out approved by the Queen.

The most expensive item is a 495 limited edition Ornamental Urn, made from fine bone china and uniquely gilded with the Royal Coat of Arms in 22 carat gold.

Each ten and a half inch urn is fired up to six times before being burnished by hand.

urn

Diamond Jubilee Musical Box

The most expensive items are a 495 limited edition Ornamental Urn, left, and 450 Halcyon Days musical box

Diamond Jubilee Limited Edition Teapot 250.00

Sold out: A 250 tea pot is already out of stock on the Royal Collection website

And just in case anyone is remotely
tempted, purchasers are warned that the urns are not dishwasher proof or
suitable for use in microwave ovens.

The official Diamond Jubilee range will be sold online as well as in royal residences, including Buckingham Palace.

The
generated revenue is not pocketed by the Queen personally but is used
for the upkeep of the Royal Collection, a treasure trove of paintings,
furniture and antiques collected by monarchs over the last 500 years and
held in trust by the present monarch on behalf of the nation.

A limited edition cake stand will set you back 395

A limited edition cake stand will set you back 395, pastries not included

Diamond Jubilee Coffee Mug

Diamond Jubilee Trio Chocolate Crowns Box

Lower end of the scale: A 25 coffee mug painted with
22 carat gold, left, and a 15.95 chocolate box

The generated revenue is not pocketed by the Queen but is used for the upkeep of the Royal Collection

The generated revenue is not pocketed by the Queen but is used for the upkeep of the Royal Collection

Officials stress that the sovereign does not approve each item personally – but it is known that little escapes her eagle eye.

The 26-strong range of items is likely to sell well.

Indeed
the collection’s range of bone china is flying off the shelves and
certain pieces – including a 145 charger based on William’s IV’s famous
Rockingham Service – is already sold out, as is a 250 teapot as well
as a cheaper 12.95 Royal Mint commemorative coin.

For those with cash to spare, however, there is still a 450 musical box whose Swiss movement plays God Save The Queen when opened.

The box features four coats of glass
particles which are applied to a copper base and fired to achieve a
smooth enamel which is then decorated by hand.

There are also several 395 cake stands on offer.

At
the lower end of the scale – relatively speaking, that is – how about a
25 coffee mug painted with 22 carat gold, or a 5.95 mint tin.

Or what about the 15.95 box of luxury milk, white and dark chocolates – each one in the shape of a crown.