Jamie Lee Curtis on her disgust at America"s fight against ageing

'Why are we obsessed with ANTI-aging' Jamie Lee Curtis on her disgust at America's fight against time

PUBLISHED:

15:36 GMT, 23 March 2012

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UPDATED:

15:48 GMT, 23 March 2012

Jamie Lee Curtis has made a name for herself in many roles and not just in regards to her movies.

For 20 years, the star of films such as Halloween, A Fish Called Wanda and Trading Places has been writing children's books, advocating for parents and blogging her thoughts on the Huffington Post.

Now though she has turned her attentions away from children and towards her own generation and in a post entitled Anti-Anti has expressed her horror at American society's obsession with anti-ageing.

Actress Jamie Lee Curtis at the 52nd Annual Golden Globe Awards

Jamie Lee Curtis

Natural process: Jamie Lee Curtis, 53, as a ravishing movie star and a matured mother of two believes using the term 'anti' to talk about ageing is appalling

'I am appalled that the term we use to talk about aging is “anti.”', writes Ms Curtis, 53. 'Aging is as natural as a baby's softness and scent. Aging is human evolution in its pure form. Death, taxes and aging.'

Wife of actor and director Christopher Guest and mother of two children, Ms Curtis believes that looking back at herself in old movies and photos and lusting after a time already consigned to history is a waste of energy.

That women her age shouldn't look after their bodies and stay mindful of their health is not, she says, up for debate, but trying to stave off the natural ageing process she feels has become 'a system of dissatisfaction.'

'We are ALL going to age and soften and mellow and transition. All of us, if we are lucky enough to make it through this hard life into older adulthood,' she writes.

Ms Curtis attributes this approach to ageing to America's preoccupation with eternal youth.

'I am appalled that the term we use to talk about aging is “anti”. Aging is as natural as a baby's softness and scent. Aging is human evolution in its pure form. Death, taxes and aging.'

'We are in the chain of our ancestors, like it or not,' she assures her readers. 'These are truths to be celebrated and in other countries they are. The term older and wiser is actually in play everywhere but here.

'In America, we celebrate youth and all youth's indiscretions and follies. We cling to the shiny new thing, we stare at altered photographs and wonder why we don't measure up.'

And in a rallying cry she asks men to 'join the beat' of the drum that she says is getting louder.

'Men, honor your women and girls. Tell them that they are beautiful and show them that you mean it. Pattern your behavior so that young men can learn about what are and are not appropriate ways to talk about women.

'There are plenty of things to be anti about as a family. Let's try to stop aging as being one of them.'

Ms Curtis' strong opinions on the subject have provoked considerable debate among readers, many of whom feel that there is nothing wrong with wanting to prolong life and delay ageing if it means feeling young and energetic for longer.