"I end up doing my sons homework. Its wrong, but so much easier": Self-confessed "Scary Mommy" admits all in new book


'I end up doing my son’s homework. It’s wrong, but so much easier': Self-confessed 'Scary Mommy' admits all in new book

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UPDATED:

22:39 GMT, 4 April 2012

Nowadays on the blogosphere there exists a litany of parenting websites that would have you believe motherhood is a shiny, happy, effortless experience full of cute burps and sunny days in the park.

But one mother has come clean and confessed to the everyday challenges of caring for her children, the mean-spirited thoughts she entertains and the corners she cuts.

In a new book, based on the hit blog, Confessions of a Scary Mommy, Jill Smokler reveals guilty secrets like: 'I end up doing my son’s homework. It’s wrong, but so much easier.'

It ain't easy: Confessions of A Scary Mommy author has released a book in which she urges parents not to try and be perfect by admitting her guilty secrets

It ain't easy: Confessions of A Scary Mommy author has released a book in which she urges parents not to try and be perfect by admitting her guilty secrets

The wife and mother of three from Baltimore, Maryland started writing the blog four years ago in an attempt to demystify the fantasy of the perfect parent.

She writes: '[Motherhood is] dirty and scary and beautiful and hard and miraculous and exhausting and thankless and joyful and frustrating all at once.

Flawed: Jill Smokler, a mother of three, says her children understand that she isn't perfect but she loves them and is doing the best she can

The book comes after the resounding success of the blog of the same title

Flawed: Jill Smokler, a mother of three and author, says her children understand that she isn't perfect but she loves them and is doing the best she can

'It’s everything. Anyone who claims that motherhood is only the good stuff is simply in denial (or she’s on some serious drugs). Admitting that this job isn’t always easy doesn’t make somebody a bad mother. At least, it shouldn’t.'

Her daily tales of woe and hysteria and the controversial revelations they produce are read by over a million people every month who are no doubt as entertained as they comforted by her candour.

In the very first chapter of her new
book the author lists nine confessions that range from the perfectly
understandable to the hilarious to the undeniably moving.

Happy families: The author confesses: 'I end up doing my sons homework. Its wrong, but so much easier'

Happy families: The author confesses in her new book: 'I end up doing my son's homework. It's wrong, but so much easier'

'I confess that most days, I feel like I have no idea what I’m doing' she writes, followed by: 'I kiss my young teenager good-bye in the morning as she leaves for school, rising above the hormone-fueled snarling and histrionics. Then I close the front door and flip her off, with both hands.'

FIVE CONFESSIONS OF A SCARY MOMMY
Sometimes I just let my children fall asleep in front of the TV.
I clock out of motherhood at 8 P.M. and hide in the basement with my laptop and a beer.
I joined a gym just for the free day care. I drop the kids off and read magazines and blogs in the locker room.
I miss the career I gave up more than I miss my son when I go to the grocery store.
I tried for seven years to get pregnant and now that I’m a mother, I wonder whether it was all worth it.

Mrs Smokler hopes that her witty and heartfelt testament to motherhood will incite other mothers who are overwhelmed with advice on how to bake the perfect cookie, to join in and accept their flaws and imperfections so that they can become better equipped at dealing with the pressures together.

And she also hopes that in doing so, they will set up an important precedence for their children in later years.

She told MSNBC's Today Show: 'I looked at my parents as perfect and I felt like it put pressure on me to raise my kids that way and it made it harder. My kids will never think of me as the perfect parent.'

In a stirring and playful call to action, she asks her contemporaries to read aloud her Scary Mommy manifesto and make the pledge to become a less perfect mother.

'I shall not question the mother who is wearing the same yoga pants, flip-flops, and T-shirt she wore to school pickup the day before. She has good reason,' she exclaims.

'I shall shoot the parents of the screaming newborn on the airplane looks of compassion rather than resentment. I am fortunate to be able to ditch the kid upon landing. They, however, are not.'