How to date like it"s 1964… the first issue of teen magazine Jackie"s quaint fashion tips


How to date like it's 1964… the first issue of teen magazine Jackie's quaint fashion tips

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UPDATED:

09:06 GMT, 5 July 2012

Girls, if you sometimes despair of ever meeting Mr Right, then look no further.

All you need to do is get a haircut, douse yourself in perfume – and find some boys.

At least, that was the advice provided by the first ever issue of Jackie magazine in 1964, when the dating game seemed rather more straightforward.

The strikingly innocent tips have come to light after a copy of the launch issue was discovered at a charity shop.

Rare find: The first-ever Jackie cover features a youthful Cliff Richard as its star

Rare find: The first-ever Jackie cover features a youthful Cliff Richard as its star

The way to a man's heart... is via a liberal dose of scent, according to Jackie's perfume tips

The way to a man's heart… is via a liberal dose of scent, according to Jackie's perfume tips

The edition, which features a youthful Cliff Richard on the front cover, is believed to be one of the last copies left in the world.

Featuring pin-up posters of Elvis and The Beatles, it also boasts a charming array of features aimed at the teenage girl of yesteryear.

And to all those struggling to find a boyfriend, it cheerily recommends: ‘Get with a swish hairdo and a snazzy dress, slosh on lots of perfume and go where the boys are.’

The amazing discovery of the relic – once a staple for every teenage girl – brings into focus the mindset of the post-war adolescent.

Its pages are packed with useful advice on everything from kissing to perfume – some of which could have been plucked from today’s teenage magazines.

On sale for just 6d (about 2p) and emblazoned with a the youthful face of Cliff Richard, the magazine’s masthead reads: ‘Jackie: for go-ahead teens’.

And to celebrate its launch, on January 11 of that year, the magazine gave away a free ‘nifty-neat’ heart-shaped ring to every reader with the advice: ‘If you’re still looking for the guy, the ring might just lead to an introduction.’

Sound advice: The magazine features tips that are rather quaint by modern standards

Sound advice: The magazine features tips that are rather quaint by modern standards

The magazine featured posters of The Beatles, pictured, and Elvis Presley to adorn their walls

The magazine featured posters of The Beatles, pictured, and Elvis Presley to adorn their walls

Inside readers find ‘dreamy picture love stories’ as well as a double-page spread on the latest rainbow-coloured macintoshes.

The relic was discovered by charity worker Martin Cook, 53, when he was sorting through a box of old magazines donated to Treetops Hospice in Risley, in Derbyshire.

Its near mint condition suggests it has barely been touched since the day it was bought – and it is doubtful the previous owner even knew it was there.

Mr Cook said: ‘We didn’t see who brought it in and I wasn’t even aware it was special until I realised it was the first ever issue.

‘Then I started to get excited. My wife is a Cliff Richard fan so I’ve been to lots of his concerts. Seeing him in this magazine was like a trip down memory lane.

‘I haven’t read the whole magazine as it’s not my kind of thing but I’m hoping it will make lots of money for the hospice.’

Cliff features heavily in the magazine, with a regular feature called The Cliff Alphabet – beginning, bizarrely, with ‘E for Extravagance’.

And for the unlucky in love, there are plenty of tips on hand – especially in the kissing department, where girls are advised not to wear sharp jewellery or eat onions beforehand.

The writer warns: ‘If you don’t want to kiss, just say no – don’t duck.’
Mr Cook, who works as the hospice warehouse assistant lives with his wife Karen, 49, in nearby Stapleford, believes it could be one of the only copies of the first issue left.

Discovery: The magazine was found by charity worker Martin Cook of Treetops Hospice, Risley, Derbyshire

Discovery: The magazine was found by charity worker Martin Cook of Treetops Hospice, Risley, Derbyshire

Mr Cook, pictured with Antiques Roadshow presenter Fiona Bruce, will appear on the show in the autumn

Mr Cook, pictured with Antiques Roadshow presenter Fiona Bruce, will appear on the show in the autumn

He took it to show experts from the Antiques Roadshow when crews were filming in the area last month, who valued it at between 200-300.

Jackie became Britain’s best-selling weekly magazine for girls in the ten years after it launched, with the best-selling issue in 1972 featuring American singer David Cassidy.

Its name arose simply by choosing from handful of girls’ names – although it was almost dropped because of its association with Jackie Kennedy after her husband’s assassination.

But by the 1990s, its wholesome content was being beaten by the racier magazines and it was closed in 1993 amid dwindling circulation.

The publisher, DC Thomson, later resurrected it in the form of the historic Jackie annual.

The episode of Antiques Roadshow featuring the magazine is due to be broadcast on BBC One this autumn and the hospice hope to sell it later this year.