How plastic surgery can shave nine years from your appearance – but that"s only if you have three procedures

How plastic surgery can shave nine years from your appearance – but that's only if you have three procedures

A new study has found that plastic surgery can shave up to an average of nine years from an person's age appearance.

Not only do the University of Toronto results quantify, for the first time, the youth-giving surgery's effects, but researchers found that the findings held true even when patients were younger to begin with and despite other factors potentially influencing looks.

And, the more plastic surgery procedures an individual had had, the greater the number of years between real and perceived age, according to the report published yesterday in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Under the knife: Patients looked nine years younger if they had had three lifts, the difference between real and perceived age dropped with fewer procedures

Under the knife: Patients looked nine years younger if they had had three lifts, the difference between real and perceived age dropped with fewer procedures

Before-and-after photos of 60-year-olds were shown to 40 first year medical students. They were asked to estimate the ages of the 53 women and 7 men before going under the knife and then afterwards, reports ABC News.

The patients had all had a variety of facial lifts and had each undergone between one and three procedures. 22 had a face and neck lift, 17 had a face and neck lift as well as an eyelid lift and a further 22 had a face and neck lift, an eyelid lift and a forehead lift.

Perhaps to be expected, patients who had had more lifts, nips and tucks looked notably younger than their peers who had had fewer procedures, found Dr Nitin Chauhan and his team.

Those who had undergone one procedure looked an average of 5.7 years younger, while those who had had two operations, such as a neck lift and a facelift, appeared 7.5 years younger.

The patients who had lumped for yet another lift, having a total of three plastic surgery procedures, looked 8.4 years younger, in the eyes of the medical students.

The study has been seen by experts to cement anecdotal evidence in the industry – namely, that not only does 'facial rejuvenation' do actually what it says it will do, but that success is best measured by the perceptions of others.

Dr Garry Brody, professor of plastic surgery at the University of Southern California, warned ABC News that it is important for patients to remain as realistic as they can before going under the cosmetic surgeon's knife.

The study's authors write that they hope the findings will help doctors give patients solid evidence 'when formulating their preoperative expectations.'

They add that the data raise further questions: 'How many years' reduction in
perceived aging can we achieve while retaining a natural untreated look
Many
patients state that they “want to look good for
their age.” What does this really mean Is it a qualitative measure, or
can
it be quantified'