How modern parents give in to children"s demands and buy them all the latest toys and gadgets


How modern parents give in to children's demands and buy them all the latest toys and gadgets

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UPDATED:

15:05 GMT, 15 August 2012

Parents today are succumbing to their children's demand for gifts and gadgets whenever they ask for them.

The 'Generation Give-In' style of parenting has been embraced by mums and dads who feel guilty for working long hours and don't want their children to be bullied at school for not having the latest 'must-have' item.

Bribery and encouragement for doing homework were other reasons why parents said they were shelling out almost 500 a year on gifts for their little ones.

Generation give-in: Parents today are buying their children whatever they ask for as a bribe to make them do their homework or because they feel guilty about working long hours (posed by models)

Generation give-in: Parents today are buying their children whatever they ask for as a bribe to make them do their homework or because they feel guilty about working long hours (posed by models)

Rather than waiting until their son or daughter has 'earned' the privilege of being treated to something new, six in ten parents admit they buy their children the latest trends and collectables as soon as they ask for them.

Seventeen per cent said they didn't want to disappoint their children when they are under peer pressure at school to have the best of everything.

Tracy Fletcher of Skipton Building Society, which carried out the research, said: 'Parents are naturally concerned about their children having strong friendships, and feeling part of their peer group both in and out of school.

'And if they think they can help the child become more popular, they will.

'Unfortunately, this seems to mean spending endless amounts of money on playground crazes, collectables, latest trends in fashion, and gadgets.

'This instant gratification could have consequences in the future though, as children will grow up without grasping the real value of money, or learning how to manage it effectively.'

The study revealed parents of children aged five to nine are most likely to buy Ben 10 toys, Moshi Monsters, football stickers and Lego.

Kids aged ten to 12 will nag mum and dad for Xbox and PS3 games, gadgets, magazines and football boots, while those aged 13 to 15 expect to be treated to iPhones, iPads, mobile phones, computer games and apps.

Peer pressure: Parents are buying their children gadgets like mobile phones so they can fit in at school (posed by models)

Peer pressure: Parents are buying their children gadgets like mobile phones so they can fit in at school (posed by models)

A third of concerned parents don’t like to deny their children these 'must have' items in case they are teased or bullied for going without by their friends.

Six in ten admit it is really important to them that their child 'fits in' with their friends, and 34 per cent admit to spoiling their child as a result.

More than half of mums and dads claim their child is much more spoilt than they were at their age, and, in the past, their parents would only have treated them to new toys and games on for birthdays and Christmas.

Many of the parents polled claim it is 'necessary' for modern children to have televisions in their bedroom, handheld games consoles, laptops and smart phones.

Sixteen per cent of parents say children should always own a pair of fashionable trainers, a quarter feel they should have the latest in computer games and 19 per cent think they should be in possession of an mp3 player.

The poll found that, as well as buying clothes, toys and games, parents are also forking out hundreds of pounds on pocket money.

Children as young as five are receiving more than 2.50 a week, with this rising to just under a fiver for teenagers.

Tracy Fletcher added: 'We’ve been living through a credit crunch for more than four years now which, although difficult, could also result in youngsters better understanding how important it is to spend and save money wisely.

'As with many things in life, while a quick fix like buying a gift or treat might provide a temporary solution to an issue, it could also give rise to greater problems in the future.

'Although saying no can be really hard, it’s an important lesson in life which could help ensure our children are prepared for when they’re older and have to make ends meet for themselves.'

PARENTS TOP 'GIVE-IN' PURCHASES

AGE 5-9 AGE 10-12 AGE 13-15
Ben 10 toys Clothes iPhone
Nike trainers iPhone Mobile phone
Moshi monsters Xbox games All computer games
Lego Football boots DVD’s
Magazines iPod iPad
Football stickers Books Mobile phone apps
Adidas trainers Gadgets Blackberry
Nintendo DS games PS3 games Nike trainers
Computer games Dr Who toys Clothes
Sweets Magazines Adidas trainers