How Mexican teens are catching on to Japan"s love affair with "Lolita" style


How Mexican teens are catching on to Japan's love affair with 'Lolita' style

Lolita is a fashion subculture from Japan, influenced by clothing from the Victorian and Rococo eras

The style has no association with the book Lolita

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UPDATED:

18:15 GMT, 3 May 2012

The Japanese fashion subculture Lolita has made its way to Mexico, and the trend appears to be a hit.

The trend
Lolita is often associated with Vladimir Nabokov's novel by the same
name, referred to as cute, 'nymphet'-inspired styles in high fashion magazines.

However the Lolita style is influenced by clothing from the grand, but demure, Victorian and Rococo eras, its roots lying in modesty rather than promiscuity.

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club share a moment together in a park in Monterrey

Pretty in pastels: Members of the Lolitas Paradise club share a moment together in a park in Monterrey

Its basic style consists of a buttoned up blouse, petticoat, bloomers, bell-shaped skirt, knee-high socks, and heavy make-up with an influence from Japan's Anime media.

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club in Monterrey are turning what was once a sporadic and limited style outside of Japan into a prominent fixture in South America.

A member of Lolitas Paradise club
said: 'The goal of Lolita is not to create a sexy image but rather to
maintain a cute or elegant appeal.

'The
intention of Lolita fashion is for women to wear what makes them feel
beautiful and dress for their own happiness, not for the approval of the
opposite sex,' she added.

Alin Nava poses in front of a mirror in her bedroom

Sweet frills: Alin Nava, 25, poses in front of a mirror in her bedroom

A member of the Lolitas Paradise club adjusts her headband

Bows and pearls: A member of the Lolitas Paradise club adjusts her headband

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club walk together in Monterrey - its basic style consists of a blouse, petticoat, bloomers, bell-shaped skirt and knee-high socks

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club walk together in Monterrey – its basic style consists of a blouse, petticoat, bloomers, bell-shaped skirt and knee-high socks

Alin Nava, 25, walks to the supermarket in Monterrey

Street style: Miss Nava walks to the supermarket in Monterrey

Ellie Frye, a 24-year-old Lolita
reinforced this idea: 'It’s not, as some commentators have suggested,
some sort of appeal to men’s expectation that women should be childlike,
or an attempt to pander to pedophiles.

'Pedophiles
like little girls. They don’t like grown women who happen to like
dresses with cakes on them. I’ve never been hit on by a pedophile while
in Lolita. We don’t get into it because it is some sort of misplaced
pedo complex or anything, and the objective isn’t simply to emulate
little girls, despite the name Lolita,' she explained to Jezebel.

The style, which emerged from the
Japanese street fashion scene in the Nineties, has many incarnations and
subsects, among them Elegant Gothic Lolitas, Erotic Lolitas, Gory
Lolitas, Sweet Lolitas and White Lolitas.

Passers-by look at a member of the Lolitas Paradise club in Monterrey

Curious strangers: Passers-by look at a member of the Lolitas Paradise club in Monterrey


Miss Nava stands in a checkout line at a supermarket in Monterrey

Standing out: Miss Nava stands in a checkout line at a supermarket in Monterrey

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club fold a cloth after a picnic in a park in Monterrey

Friends alike: Members of the Lolitas Paradise club fold a cloth after a picnic in a park in Monterrey

Members of the Lolitas Paradise club share a moment together in a park in Monterrey, where they believe the style is not only a fashion statement but also a way to express their loyalty, friendship, tolerance and unity

Sub-culture: Members of the Lolitas Paradise club share a moment together in a park in Monterrey, where they believe the style is not only a fashion statement but also a way to express their loyalty, friendship, tolerance and unity

While some Lolitas veer toward the
goth influence with inky black garb, others emphasise a kitschy
'cuteness' through pastel colors and pretty bows.

Major Japanese brands, like the
Metamorphose temps de fille, Moi-mme-Moiti, Angelic Pretty, and Baby
The Stars Shine Bright started shipping Lolita products and goods to the
international marketplace three years ago.

However, with the demand increasing, many non-Japanese designers are producing their own Lolita style and range of clothing, enabling pockets of the sub-culture to flourish outside of Japan.