How Kayt Sukel was inspired to write a book after having an orgasm in an MRI scanner


'Sex is between your ears': How one woman was inspired to write a book after having an orgasm in an MRI scanner

A woman who reached orgasm in an MRI machine as part of a scientific study has gone on to write a book inspired by her experience.

Kayt Sukel, who masturbated and had two consecutive orgasms in the medical scanner as part of a Rutgers University-led experiment, was inspired to publish Dirty Minds: How Our Brains Influence Love, Sex, and Relationships.

The book describes, among other things, how sexual satisfaction affects chemical activity in the brain.

Inspired: Kayt Sukel, who took part in an experiment that saw her climax in an MRI machine has now written a book on how sex relates to the brain

Inspired: Kayt Sukel, who took part in an experiment that saw her climax in an MRI machine has now written a book on how sex relates to the brain

The one-time Harvard neuroscience research assistant, 37, enthuses: 'I now had a great story if anyone ever asked
me to name the strangest place I'd had an orgasm. And I had helped
science while doing it. Triumph for all parties concerned!'

When asked how she managed to climax twice in the sterile, cold tunnel, she said the key was to keep as still as possible throughout the process.

She told ABC News: 'This is a question I get asked a lot, and honestly the answer is to remain very, very still. 'As it turns out, if you move around too much having an orgasm, the FMRI can't pick up the activation

Stimulating research: Ms Sukel pictured before entering the MRI scanner, in which she would reach orgasm twice

Stimulating research: Ms Sukel pictured before entering the MRI scanner, in which she would reach orgasm twice

'So practice makes perfect, after a week
or two of trying to stay as still as possible, which, as I know, Cosmo
highly recommends against doing, you too can have an orgasm in an FMRI
scanner.'

Masked: The author had to remain absolutely still during both orgasms so that her brain activity was recognised

Masked: The author had to remain absolutely still during both orgasms so that her brain activity was recognised

Explaining how sexual satisfaction relates to brain activity, she explained: 'Sex is between your ears. Our brain is really an important part of orgasm.'

Ms Sukel's book, titled Dirty Minds, is on sale now

Ms Sukel's book, titled Dirty Minds, is on sale now

Ms Sukel's book also examines what happens in the brain that makes people fall
in love, whether sex addition is a valid affliction and why 'good girls
like bad boys.'

Referring to the scientific theory known as Epigenetics, she looks at the neurochemicals that mediate love and how they affect not just our emotional sensibilities but how our focus and attention can alter too.

And not discounting pregnancy and childbirth as part of her research she considered the way she felt when her own baby was born.

She recalled: 'My baby was pretty sexy – much more than I'd been prepared for. Not in a sweaty, naked-hot-guy kind of way, but in an irresistible, compelling way that altered my body, my mind, and my life from top to bottom.'

This was thanks to the brain's release of the love hormone, oxytocin during the lactation period; a hormone that is also produced during orgasm.

Ms Sukel mused: 'I had to take care of a helpless thing, and thank goodness the biology helped give me the mental and emotional toolkit to cope with that.'