Help, I"ve got OCD (that"s Obsessive Cushion Desire)


Help, I've got OCD (that's Obsessive Cushion Desire)

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UPDATED:

23:19 GMT, 25 April 2012

The doorbell rings and I rush to answer it with a flutter of excitement. I’ve ordered something that will instantly update my ‘look’, in this season’s must-have shade.

But this is not my latest online purchase from Asos — it’s a beautiful pair of cushions and I can’t wait to place them proudly on my sofa.

I admit there are already 12 similar squares sitting beside them — not to mention the ten I have on my bed — but these two plump yellow gingham cushions, a bargain at only 45 each, were simply too beautiful to resist.

Obsessive Cushion Desire: Diana can't resist buying cushions (posed by model)

Obsessive Cushion Desire: Diana can't resist buying cushions (posed by model)

The problem is I now have to find a way of hiding them from my husband, Ross. He believes, and not without grounds, that I am in the grip of a new condition, Obsessive Cushion Desire. At night Ross has a ritual of flinging each one off our bed and onto the floor. This drives me mad, because I love my cushions and that is no way to treat them.

So why are we women so obsessed with cushions According to a survey by B&Q we now spend more on cushions than ever and they, and every other home store, are cashing in by introducing new designs and colours practically every week — the latest feature patriotic Jubilee images.

For me, no room is complete without them. They provide a splash of colour and there’s nothing more satisfying than spending half an hour every day plumping them all up with mathematical precision.

I know I’m not the only one who feels
this way. Home design guru Kirstie Allsopp says: ‘There are simply not
enough cushions in the world. My home is a testament to this, laden with
an assortment that I’ve both collected and made over the years. It’s a
lot easier on your wallet than expensive shoes, and a great way to
ensure you never tire with the look of your home.’

Jubilee trend: Makers are cashing in on our cushion obsession with patriotic designs like this one

Jubilee trend: Makers are cashing in on our cushion obsession with patriotic designs like this one

I couldn’t agree more. Most of mine are bought to match the curtains, the carpet or the pictures on the wall, but I’ve also been known to base an entire room’s colour scheme around a favourite cushion. When my husband found the 240 bill for a pair I bought recently he thought I’d gone crazy. ‘How much’ he bellowed, ‘for another pair of b***** cushions we don’t need It’s ludicrous. This has to stop.’

So I did stop — to think about what my cushion collection was for. Looking nice Being comfy Making me feel warm and happy inside My cashmere cushions (I have ten) are simply just for stroking. How does the saying go: so many cushions, so little time.

Ross says cushions are just an obstacle to be removed before sitting down, and he either hurls them around the room or launches himself on top of them like a hippo crowd-surfing at a pop concert.

I’m sure a psychologist would say our OCD has something to do with our latent desire to nest, most obvious in pregnancy.

Men do not care about colour schemes or cushions. In a living room they want a glass of beer, the telly and the remote control. For me, the cold wind may blow outside, but inside, in a home full of cosy little squares of colour, I’m as snug as a bug in a rug. Now, if you’ll excuse me, the Peacock Blue website is having a sale. Just don’t tell Ross.