Heartbroken men take four weeks longer than women to change their Facebook status after a break-up


Heartbroken men take four weeks longer than women to change their Facebook status after a break-upAround 63 per cent of men 'prolong the misery' of
updating their profile from 'In a Relationship' to 'Single'
Almost 20 per cent of women admitted they would change their profiles immediately to hurt their ex-partners

Heartbroken men take four weeks to change their Facebook status following a break-up – while women do so almost straight away, a study has revealed.

The majority of men – 63 per cent 'prolong the misery' of updating their profile from 'In a Relationship' to 'Single' for a month or more, eight per cent fail to do so at all.

If and when they do, only a third admits if they were dumped – and even fewer – 15 per cent – reveal the reasons why.

The majority of men delay updating their profile from 'In a Relationship' to 'Single' for a month longer than women

The majority of men delay updating their profile from 'In a Relationship' to 'Single' for a month longer than women

Women, on the other hand, tend to go public within a few days, often with a new description and photograph to reflect their 'happy single' status.

The study by new dating site ALovingSpace.com was based on a survey of 1,000 unmarried 18-65 year-old male and female members across the UK.

It found that male respondents generally coped with splits far worse than women, and were more likely to bottle-up their emotions and 'present a tougher front' to friends.

Painful: Men are believed to suffer from break ups more because they suppress their emotions

Painful: Men are believed to suffer from break ups more because they suppress their emotions

Almost 20 per cent of female respondents, on the other hand, admitted they had or would change their social media profiles immediately – often in order to hurt or humiliate their ex-partners.

A spokesman for ALovingSpace.com said he was 'not surprised' by the results, which appear to overturn the widespread assumption that women are more vulnerable after a break-up.

'On the face of it, men are the tough talkers and the ones who present a tougher front but that is just societal conditioning.

'Behind the facade they hurt just like women, but because they suppress their emotions it ends up hurting even more,' he said.

'Our
research appears to suggest that men are hit the hardest by
relationship break-ups and, as a result, prolong the misery of telling
the world about it on social media platforms such as Facebook.

'Women,
on the other hand, seem to see things in a more positive light, viewing
a break-up as an opportunity to move on and find someone who they are
more compatible with.'