Hard-hitting teenage rape prevention advert to tackle sexual violence among 13 to 18 year-olds airs tonight


Hard-hitting teenage rape prevention ad launched to tackle sexual violence among 13 to 18 year-olds airs tonight

A gritty ad campaign has been launched by the Home Office in an attempt to tackle teen rape after a study showed that teen are experiencing higher than average levels of sexual violence levels in their relationships.

The campaign is to be aimed at both boys and girls to let them know that abusive sexual behaviour is not normal.

An accompanying short film, to be shown in the ad breaks of youth TV programmes such as Skins, is to be aimed predominantly at teenage boys aged 13 to 18 to help them recognise such behaviour as rape.

The new Home Office advert opens with a teenage boy and girl kissing upstairs at a party

The new Home Office advert opens with a teenage boy and girl kissing upstairs at a party…

...the girl tells the boy she wants to go back downstairs and asks him to stop...

…before the girl tells the boy she wants to go back downstairs and asks him to stop…

...but he carries on, pushing the girl onto the bed and forcing her to have intercourse

…but he carries on, pushing the girl onto the bed and forcing her to have intercourse

It is hoped the campaign could also help
girls feel empowered to say no to boys, or to prompt them to seek help
where necessary.

Running with the tagline 'If you could see yourself, would you see rape' the ad demonstrates the sort of situation in which teenagers may find themselves at social gatherings.

In the advert, a boy and girl are upstairs in a bedroom and begin to kiss before the boy pushes the girl towards a bed.

The girl hesitates and pushes him away, suggesting they rejoin the party downstairs.

But the boy becomes more insistent and, pushing her down onto the bed, begins unbuttoning her jeans.

She tells him to stop, saying 'I don't want to!' – but he tells her to 'stop being weird' and continues undressing her, forcing her to have intercourse while she weeps.

Meanwhile, his alter-ego appears to be watching from a window, where he bangs against the glass and shouts at himself to stop. 'She doesn't want to! What are you doing Just stop!' he yells.

A second version of the boy watches himself from the window, shouting to stop. 'She doesn't want to!' he cries

A second version of the boy watches himself from the window, shouting to stop. 'She doesn't want to!' he cries

The boy looks anguished as his alter-ego continues imposing himself upon the girl as she weeps

The boy looks anguished as his alter-ego continues imposing himself upon the girl as she weeps

The girl sobs as he imposes himself upon her, and the tagline flashes up: 'If you could see yourself, would you see rape Sex with someone who doesn't want to is rape.'

Actor Sam Gittens who plays the main character in the advert says the campaign deals with 'one of those areas that hasn't been highlighted.'

'It's real, it's there. It's not glossed or sugar-coated. This is happpening – and there's no way you can dismiss this as not rape,' he said.

The government-funded campaign comes as a result of research carried out by the NSPCC that found a third of teenage girls and 16 per cent of boys had experienced some form of sexual violence from a boyfriend or girlfriend.

Launching the initiative at a rape crisis centre in Ealing, west London, yesterday, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg told a group of girls aged 16 to 18 that far too many people considered rape to be 'something that happens in a dark alley when a stranger inflicts physical violence' on you.

Mr Clegg told the girls, who were visiting from a local school, that it was 'shocking' a third of their peers had reported some form of sexual violence.

'If you could see yourself, would you see rape,' the tagline asks at the end of the hard-hitting commercial

'If you could see yourself, would you see rape,' the tagline asks at the end of the hard-hitting commercial

But the NSPCC warn that 250,000 teenage girls had been the victim of rape but had not reported it, discouraged by the fact that the attack had been carried out by someone their own age, or whom they knew personally.

'What we're trying to do with this advert is make sure
that people know it [rape] may be about familiar relationships with people
you've known for a long time, and maybe there's no violence involved at
all.'

Mr Clegg said the UK's 'highly sexualised culture' in the UK meant girls felt under huge pressure, and said he hoped the ad campaign would send a 'strong message' to teenagers, particularly teenage boys.

'When you've got a situation where a third of teenage girls say they have been subject to sexual coercion and abuse, when lots of teenagers say in surveys that they think it's OK for a boy to expect to have sex with a girl they spend time with, something's going wrong and we need to challenge it.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone launched the campaign yesterday at a London rape crisis centre

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone launched the campaign yesterday at a London rape crisis centre

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone launched the campaign yesterday at a London rape crisis centre

'That's why it's so hard-hitting, because we really need to shift the way people think about this,' he said.

Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone, who launched the campaign with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, said: 'Teenagers are inundated with information about relationships, from their friends, the internet and TV, so that knowing what's actually acceptable can be really difficult.

'This campaign aims to dispel the myths that can lead to acceptance of rape in relationships.

'Bringing the issue out in the open will help teenagers feel confident about challenging abuse when they see it and ultimately protect potential victims.'

Jon Brown, head of NSPCC's sexual abuse programme said in the Metro: 'From calls to our ChildLine we know that many young people misguidedly accept this as part of a relationship and so do nothing about it.

'We have to change that view, through education and advice, because this is sexual abuse and should not be tolerated under any circumstances.'

WATCH THE TEENAGE RAPE PREVENTION ADVERT:

A MINI DOCUMENTARY ON THE GOVERNMENT-FUNDED TEEN RAPE PREVENTION CAMPAIGN: