Gareth Malone is back with a new inspirational series of The Choir

High hopes: BBC's Gareth Malone is back with a new inspirational series of The Choir

|

UPDATED:

10:33 GMT, 26 August 2012

Still hailed for his inspirational influence on The Choir: Military Wives, Gareth Malone is back.

The choirmaster is going to transform the lives of NHS, Royal Mail, airport and water works staff through his new BBC2 programme.

The upcoming series will see the spectacle wearing gent make stars out of everyday people on In The Choir: Sing While You Work, which starts next month.

Standing strong: Gareth Malone, centre, is returning to TV screens with a new choir following his success with Military Wives

Standing strong: Gareth Malone, centre, is returning to TV screens with a new choir following his success with Military Wives

One of the characters of particular interest is 37-year-old Natalie Beaumont, who is a speech therapist at University Hospital Lewisham, south London.

She works with children who are slow to language and she suffered from low confidence before being taken under Gareth's musical wing.

After auditioning for the choir she told the Telegraph: 'I’ve always enjoyed singing and music is a big part of my life but I had no professional experience, I can’t read music and I hadn’t been on a stage since I was at primary school.'

Another personality to look out for is postman Sam Fry, from Bristol, who also had never sung in public.

However, under Malone's guidance the father-of-three has emerged as strong talent and his outlook on life has changed.

The voice: The new series will see everyday workers from NHS, a water works, Royal Mail and an airport, forming choirs

The voice: The new series will see everyday workers from NHS, a water works, Royal Mail and an airport, forming choirs

The tenor said: 'Gareth plucked me out and said, 'You can do it’ and I just believe in myself now.

'I walk with more of a spring in my step. I sing on my round and I’m having more of a laugh with my work mates and the customers.

'I don’t know what he’s done to me, but he’s certainly changed me. I even held somebody’s dog this morning.'

Malone believes that forming a choir in your workplace can transform the environment into something much better to be a part of.

While he is certain it wont solve all the problems at Royal Mail or the NHS, he knows it can make a difference.

He told BBC's Music magazine: 'I don’t want to make massive claims to have solved all the problems of the Royal Mail or the NHS, but it was great to bring together people from different levels, especially in a hierarchical place like a hospital.