Evidence of Robin Roberts" chemotherapy treatments clear to see on Good Morning America… But she"s still just as glamorous

Evidence of Robin Roberts' chemotherapy treatments clear to see on Good Morning America… But she's still just as glamorous

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UPDATED:

20:36 GMT, 26 June 2012

Looking radiant in all shades of purple, Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts was seen wearing a chemotherapy treatment armband during her live on-air segment earlier today.

The 51-year-old is being treated for
MDS, a blood and bone marrow disease, and announced on June 11 she will
require a transplant this fall.

Ms Roberts wore the armband, which covers her chemotherapy pic line treatments, with a tight-fitting short-sleeve dress while she visited a donor registrants centre.

Robin Roberts: Two weeks after the Good Morning America anchor revealed she will soon need a bone marrow transplant, the rate of new donor registrants has more than doubled

Robin Roberts: Two weeks after the Good Morning America anchor revealed she will need a bone marrow transplant, the rate of new donor registrants has soared

She watched Good Morning America's Lara Spencer, co-host George
Stephanopoulos and her boss, ABC News President Ben Sherwood, get
swabbed to see if their bone marrow is a match for someone who needs a
donation.

After the ABC anchor announced she will soon need a bone marrow
transplant as well as chemotherapy treatments earlier this month, the rate of new donor
registrants has more than doubled.

Jeffrey Chell, CEO of the
registry Be The Match, said some 15,000 people had registered since she
announced her diagnosis on Good Morning America – 11,200 more than they
would usually receive during one month.

Bone marrow donors: Lara Spencer (left), ABC News President Ben Sherwood (centre), and George Stephanopoulos (right) swabbed themselves at a donor registry drive at ABC News headquarters

Bone marrow donors: Lara Spencer (left), ABC News President Ben Sherwood (centre), and George Stephanopoulos (right) swabbed themselves at a donor registry drive at ABC News headquarters

Ms Roberts, who battled breast cancer
in 2007, said her older sister, Sally-Ann Roberts, will be her donor,
as she is a perfect match.

Her original announcement triggered
an outpouring of support, and she became a trending topic on Twitter
with more than 13,500 people commenting on an ABC post on Facebook that
day.

Robin Roberts announced on Good Morning America that she has been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

Robin Roberts announced on Good Morning America that she has been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

The award-winning
broadcaster, who grew up in Mississippi, tried to smile as she spoke
about the disease live on air earlier this month.

She said: 'It is something that is
called MDS… It is a rare blood disorder that affects the bone marrow,'
she said. 'I'm going to beat this. My doctors say it and my faith says
it.'

MDS, or myelodysplastic syndrome, is a
blood and bone marrow disease once known as preleukemia because of the
progression that can be seen from MDS to leukemia.

Actor Rob Lowe was one of the first people to show his support for the journalist. 'My best thoughts to Robin Roberts at #GMA. She's a great lady and a fighter,' he Tweeted.

About 18,000 people develop MDS each year and it can affect all blood cells, leading to problems such as anemia, infections and bruising.

The veteran anchor said she was given the upsetting diagnosis on the same day she found out she would be interviewing President Obama.

While some of her bone marrow was extracted for testing, she was told that she would be meeting the President the next day, which is where Obama revealed his support for gay marriage.

'The combination of landing the biggest interview of my career and having a drill in my back reminds me that God only gives us what we can handle and that it helps to have a good sense of humor when we run smack into the absurdity of life,' she said in a blog post.

WHAT IS MDS

Myelodysplastic syndromes are a group of diseases in which the bone marrow does not make enough healthy blood cells.

Age and past treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy affect the risk of developing the disease.

It affects about 18,000 people each year – but only several hundred of those are as a result of cancer treatment.

Symptoms can include shortness of breath, weakness or feeling tired, skin that is paler than usual, easy bruising or bleeding and fever or frequent infections.

The primary approach to treating MDS is a bone marrow transplant.

The more closely matched the donor and recipient are, the more likely the immune system will not reject the new marrow and treatment will be successful.