Easier questions and "Wild Wedge" squares: the newest edition of Trivial Pursuit arrives

Easier questions and 'Wild Wedge' squares: New family-friendly edition of Trivial Pursuit allows children to join in too
Trivial Pursuit launches new Family editionNew look game comes with easier questions for children and quick ways to winSince 1982 more than 50 unique editions have appeared

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UPDATED:

15:19 GMT, 25 September 2012

If you've been left scratching your head after being bamboozled by a 'simple' question during a game of Trivial Pursuit, then the new look Family Edition is for you.

Featuring questions aimed at both children and adults, the revamped version of the family classic now includes conundrums that just about anyone can answer.

Not that the game has dumbed down – you can still expect a smattering of tough ones – but the new edition has updated its repertoire of sport and culture posers, so there's no need to resort to Google for a quick lesson in 80s TV.

new Trivial Pursuit

Fresh look: the new Family edition of Trivial Pursuit

But it's not just the questions that have had an update: the game itself has had an overhaul. Instead of waiting for a 'wedge' square, the new way to play means there's a chance to win on every roll of the dice.

Every square is now a 'wedge' square, so even the time-poor can play along.

What's more, the board has a contemporary new look, with an innovative new 'wild wedge' square, which lets you move to any square you like – perfect if you're moving in for the kill.

Trivial Pursuit

Family fun: Trivial Pursuit is one of the UK's favourite family games

IN PURSUIT OF THE PERFECT BOARD GAME: A HISTORY

Trivial Pursuit was invented in 1979 by Canadian Chris Haney, a photo editor at Montreal's The Gazette newspaper, and Scott Abbott, sports editor at The Canadian.

After realising their Scrabble game had missing pieces, the duo decided to create their own game – and Trivial Pursuit was born.

Officially
launched in 1982, the game has had numerous makeovers, although the
original does still exist in the shape of the Genus edition.

The game
has also inspired TV shows, including the BBC's 1990 version, Trivial Pursuit, which was hosted by comedian, Rory McGrath.

Trivial Pursuit Family Edition, 29.99, is available at Toys R Us (toysrus.co.uk) and Argos (argos.co.uk)