Diamond Jubilee tea from a bush planted by Prince Philip in 1954 goes on sale for 25 a cup


The king of cuppas: Jubilee tea from a bush planted by Prince Philip in 1954 goes on sale for 25 a cup

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UPDATED:

22:43 GMT, 17 May 2012

Tea drinking has long been a great British past time.

Be it builder’s or Earl Grey, we’re all extremely partial to a nice cuppa.

However if you baulk at shelling out more than 50p for a brew, then how about 25

A princely sum: The Jubilee Tea will set you back 75 for 60grams - that's 25 a cup!

A princely sum: The Jubilee Tea will set you back 75 for 60grams - that's 25 a cup!

A princely sum: The Jubilee Tea will set you back 75 for 60grams – that's 25 a cup!

That’s the price per cup of The East India Company’s Jubilee Tea Blend.

However, the exclusive creation boasts some extremely elevated connections.

It has been harvested from a bush planted in Sri Lanka by Prince Philip as the royal couple embarked on their first world tour in 1954.

The planting ceremony took place at the Pedro Estate in the Nuwara Eliyatea region of Sri Lanka and took place two years after the Queen’s coronation in 1952.

The resulting brew is described as 'a subtle, long leafed tea with specks of silver and golden tips ti give a golden liquor that is light, smooth, bright and delicate – with a slight hint of sweetness.'

Surely the most exclusive cup of tea in the world, there is only a limited run of 500 silver plated caddies available.

Each caddy has been handcrafted, comes complete with its own silver spoon and is available from The East India Tea Company, at 75 for 60g.

The moment just before Prince Philip, pictured far left of shot, planted the bush from which The Jubilee Tea has been harvested

The moment just before Prince Philip, pictured far left of shot, planted the bush from which The Jubilee Tea has been harvested

Prince Philip arrives at Sri Lanka's Pedro Estate

Prince Philip arrives at Sri Lanka's Pedro Estate

The Prince, left of shot, meets the plantation's workers during his visit

The Prince, left of shot, meets the plantation's workers during his visit

Tea pickers wait for their chance to catch a glimpse of Prince Philip in 1954

Tea pickers wait for their chance to catch a glimpse of Prince Philip in 1954

Modern day workers in Sri Lanka still harvest tea by hand as in 1954 when the Prince visited

Modern day workers in Sri Lanka still harvest tea by hand as in 1954 when the Prince visited