Cruise holidays are not good for the waistline: Passengers put on a stone during a two-week break

Fat cats: Cruise passengers put on a POUND A DAY during two-week breakTempting food and drink sees seaborne holiday makers gain a pound every day

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UPDATED:

17:21 GMT, 2 May 2012

Holidays are never good for the waistline. But for those who struggle with their weight, a cruise holiday could just be the kiss of death for their diet plans.

New research has revealed that more than half of all cruise passengers put on a staggering pound in weight every day during a two-week holiday at sea.

They come back a stone heavier than when they went thanks to the on-board lifestyle of mountains of all-you-can-eat food available round the clock, coupled with the fact they take very little exercise.

All-you-can-eat: Passengers blame the high-class but often calorific dining facilities on board the ship for the extraordinary weight gain

All-you-can-eat: Passengers blame the high-class but often calorific dining facilities on board the ship for the extraordinary weight gain

Many confess they put on more weight
cruising than they do at Christmas with the high-class, but often high
calorie, dining facilities on most modern vessels.

The study was carried out by cruise specialists Bonvoyage.co.uk- although given the nature of the results, they're likey to wish they hadn't bothered – the worrying findings are unlikely to encourage those watching their weight to try a seaborne adventure.

The independent cruise travel agent surveyed 1,281 Brits who had been on a cruise to find 52 per cent said they put on up to a stone (6.35kg) during a two week holiday.

A further six per cent fared yet worse, putting on up to 18 pounds, while around one in 11 (nine per cent) put on around four pounds.

Post holiday bulge: Figures show that 31 per cent of passengers ate double their normal diet over a two-week break

Post holiday bulge: Figures show that 31 per cent of passengers ate double their normal diet over a two-week break

More than eight in ten (84 per cent) admitted they ate a lot more than normal as they cruised the oceans and 31 per cent said they ate double their normal calories.

And over four in ten (41 per cent) struggle to lose the extra weight once they got home from their adventure.

Indeed, passenger Rosalie Nunn, 27,
from Lincoln joined a world cruise for a week last year and was
surprised to discover that there is a tailor on board whose main job is
to adjust clothing that no longer fits.

She
explained: ' I was in shock when I spoke to the tailor on the ship who
told me she is booked up adjusting passenger clothing after they've put
on weight. She said most people will leave the ship at least one dress
size bigger.

'I spoke to one lady who is a regular
cruise-goer and she said she brings larger-sized clothing to accommodate
the inevitable weight gain. The results don't surprise me though the
food is constant and you've got to be well restrained to resist it,' she
adds.

Celebrity chef: Marco Pierre White has restaurants on board four of the P&O cruise fleet

Celebrity chef: Marco Pierre White has restaurants on board four of the P&O cruise fleet

Steph Curtin, cruise development
manager of bonvoyage.co.uk, blamed the all-inclusive culture of modern
cruise holidays for the shocking weight gain.

She said: 'I am as guilty as these
respondents when it comes to indulging when on a cruise holiday. It can
be difficult to refuse the food and drink on offer.

'This
is particularly the case when on an all-inclusive cruise, where you
know that all of the tempting food on offer has already been paid for.'