Busy Britons wolf down their evening meal in just 11 minutes… but spend 15 minutes washing up

Now that's fast food: Busy Britons wolf down their evening meal in just 11 minutes… but spend 15 minutes washing up
The average worker spends up to 30 minutes preparing their dinner – and just 11 minutes eating it
Britons devote a further 15 minutes to the washing-up, a study foundA quarter of those surveyed admitted they would rather eat in front of the TV than with their partner

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UPDATED:

15:10 GMT, 25 October 2012

Fast food: The average Briton spends just 11 minutes wolfing down their evening meal

Fast food: The average Briton spends just 11 minutes wolfing down their evening meal

Most people would describe the washing up as the worst part of an evening meal.

But new research has revealed we spend longer preparing and clearing up after our dinner than we do actually eating it.

The average busy British worker wolfs down their meal in just 11 minutes, according to a new study – only to spend 15 minutes at the sink washing their dirty plates and cutlery.

This is after having devoted up to 30 minutes to preparing our home-cooked food.

The
study found that one in five adults, or 19 per cent, slave over a
cooker for up to half an hour when they get home from work.

After their meal, they spend a further 15 minutes washing cutlery, crockery and utensils.

Slaving over a hot stove: One in five adults devote up to 30 minutes to preparing their evening meal

Slaving over a hot stove: One in five adults devote up to 30 minutes to preparing their evening meal

TEA-TIME FOR THE TIME-POOR
One in five adults spend up to 30 minutes preparing their evening mealThe average Briton wolfs their dinner down in just 11 minutesThey then spend 15 minutes doing the washing-upOne in four adults would rather eat in front of the TV than with their partner at the tableOne in ten couples eat separately every week night

We also spend the equivalent of an hour every week in supermarkets selecting ingredients with which to make our meals.

The research suggests the post-work meal is an unsociable affair in many homes across the country, with a quarter of 1,300 adults surveyed admitting they would rather eat in front of the television than sitting at a table with their partner.

And the hectic lives of working couples mean one in ten eat separately every night of the week, because they get home at completely different times.

But 11 per cent of those surveyed said they would rather spend less time cooking and more time relaxing with their partner.

Charlie Bigham, founder of the Bigham's range of ready meals which commissioned the study, said: 'It is astonishing couples spend so much valuable time cooking their evening meal but so little time enjoying it with loved ones.'