Brianne Good: Miss Teen America hopeful traded her beauty queen dream for a career in the Army

From pageants to the frontline: Why Miss Teen America hopeful traded her beauty queen dream for a career in the Army

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UPDATED:

20:20 GMT, 28 March 2012

Rather than hoping for world peace, a former beauty pageant hopeful has decided to fight for her country.

Brianne Good, a 19 year-old private first class with the U.S. Army, had been in the middle of 2010’s Miss Teen America’s application process when she decided to enter military service according to NBC 11 News.

The teenager deployed in January and is now stationed in Qatar, specialising in communications and mechanics.

Career turnaround: 19-year-old Brianne Wood gave up her quest for beauty pageant fame to become a private first class for the U.S. army

Brianne Wood in the army

Career change: 19-year-old Brianne Good ditched her quest for beauty pageant fame for a career in the U.S. Army. She is now a private first class, stationed in Qatar and specialising in communications and mechanics

She will stay in the Middle East for at least one more year and she said she plans to be in the Army for another 17 or 18 years.

It is a world away from the runways of sashes and tiaras she had once dreamed of.

Miss Good had completed a phone interview with a Miss Teen America representative two weeks before an Army recruiter got in touch with her.

The Army offered college tuition if she would only agree to jump on board.

Role model: The teenager said she hopes to encourages more women to join the army. In contrast, she said she was 'uncomfortable' with all the work that came with competing with beauty pageants

Role model: The teenager said she hopes to encourages more women to join the Army. In contrast, she said she was 'uncomfortable' with all the work that came with competing with beauty pageants

The decision was easy for Miss Good, as she had already had concerns about the world of beauty pageants.

‘I was going around getting sponsors and getting all my stuff for the pageant, practicing my walk and going to stylists and such,’ she told NBC.

‘I was just uncomfortable with the whole ordeal.’

She is far more passionate about encouraging more women to enter military service.

She said: ‘The nation needs women to support the military. With the different cultures that we go to, males can’t play the same role that women play.

Beauty queen: She had been interviewed by Miss Teen America two weeks before she heard from the Army

Beauty queen: She had been interviewed by Miss Teen America two weeks before she heard from the Army

‘It’s good to have women in the military to be able to complete the mission.’

According to information collated by the Department of Defence and the U.S. Coast Guards, 76,694 women were enlisted in the Army at the end of September of last year. It is only 13.6per cent of the entire serving force.

Women have always been limited in the roles they enlist in. But numbers may improve in time to come after the Pentagon recently released more than 14,000 jobs in the army to women. The new jobs still excludes combat duty.

But Miss Good and her family are hopeful that the new opportunities will bring more women closer to the front line.

Family first: Miss Good is pictured here with her mother Heather, siblings and father. Mrs Good told NBC11 she believed more women should take her daughter's lead and join the Army

Family first: Miss Good is pictured here with her mother Heather, siblings and father. Mrs Good told NBC11 she believed more women should take her daughter's lead and join the Army

Her mother Heather Good told NBC: ‘I get kind of mad because I know there are some things that she wanted to go for that she couldn’t. A ranger, I think it was.

‘I think women should be able to participate if they like.’

Mrs Good said sexism still exists among her colleagues.

‘The males don't really expect that you can do the same thing as them, so they kind of treat you like a child while they're walking you through it,’ she said.

‘And then it feels really good to show them up,’