Bob Hoskins reveals he is suffering from Parkinson"s Disease as he announces retirement from acting career

Bob Hoskins reveals he is suffering from Parkinson's Disease as he announces retirement from his 'wonderful acting career'
His agent said Hoskins, 69, was given the diagnosis in the autumn and planned to spend time with his familyHoskins, from Suffolk in England, has played a range of roles since the 1970s, ranging from gangster films to comedy rolesParkinson's is a neurological condition which is thought to affect around 127,000 people in the UK and has no known cure

|

UPDATED:

19:50 GMT, 8 August 2012


Retiring: Bob Hoskins was given the diagnosis in the autumn. Announcing his retirement the star's agent said he planned to spent time with his family

Retiring: Bob Hoskins was given the diagnosis in the autumn. Announcing his retirement the star's agent said he planned to spent time with his family

Actor Bob Hoskins has announced his retirement from acting after being diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease.

The 69-year-old star – whose career spans four decades – starred in Hollywood hits such as Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Long Good Friday and just this year he played a dwarf alongside Kristen Stewart in Snow White & The Huntsman

Announcing his retirement today, his agent said Hoskins was given the diagnosis in the autumn and planned to spend time with his family.

A statement, issued on his behalf, said: 'Bob Hoskins wishes to announce that he will be retiring from acting, following his diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease last autumn.

'He wishes to thank all the great and brilliant people he has worked with over the years, and all of his fans who have supported him during a wonderful career.

'Bob is now looking forward to his retirement with his family, and would greatly appreciate that his privacy be respected at this time.'

Parkinson's is a neurological condition which is thought to affect around 127,000 people in the UK and has no known cure.

It is often known for the tremors which it causes but other effects are include slow movements and depression.

Hoskins has appeared in more than 70 films since first finding screen success in the early 1970s, beginning with small parts and becoming a familiar face through his starring role in Dennis Potter's BBC series Pennies From Heaven.

Hoskins is perhaps best known for his role in 1988 Hollywood hit Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Hoskins is perhaps best known for his role in 1988 Hollywood hit Who Framed Roger Rabbit

PARKINSON'S DISEASE EXPLAINED

Parkinson's Disease is a chronic neurological disorder.

People with the condition don't have enough of a chemical called dopamine because some nerve cells in their brain have died.

This affects the way the brain co-ordinates the movements of the muscles in different parts of the body.

The disease mainly develops in the over 50s.

About 5 in 1,000 people in their 60s, and about 40 in 1,000 people in their 80s have the condition.

The main symptoms are slowness of movement, stiffness of muscles and shaking.

These tend to slowly worsen with time although the rate varies from patient to patient.

The condition is diagnosed from the symptoms shown by the patient. It also increases your risk of dementia.

About half of people with PD develop dementia at some stage.

Depression is also common among sufferers.

There is currently no cure but drugs and physiotherapy can treat symptoms.

There have also been recent promising trials using deep brain stimulation.

The north London-raised star spent a
brief spell working in a circus, as well as being a porter and lorry
driver before turning to acting.

Although he rose to prominence in
gritty British films – notably in The Long Good Friday, as underworld
boss Harold Shand and in Mona Lisa – he successfully built up a profile
in the US.
Hoskins' performances have gone on to include Mermaids opposite Cher, as well as Hook and Super Mario Bros.

His instantly- recognisable London accent did not stop him from taking a role as FBI boss J Edgar Hoover in the 1995 film Nixon.

And despite big-budget hits, he has
been more than happy to appear in low-budget movies such as the Shane
Meadows-directed A Room For Romeo Brass.

Hoskins – whose characters often have a heart of gold – is also known for his association with a

British Telecom (now BT) ad campaign, featuring the line “It's good to talk”.

The star has been married to his second wife Linda for over 30 years.

They married in 1982, four years after he split from first wife Jane Livesey, with whom has two adult children Alex and Sarah – both in their thirties.

With Linda he has two children – Rosa, 29, an actress carving out a career in theatre and television and a 27-year-old son, Jack.

Hoskins is not the first high-profile actor to be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

Back To The Future star Michael J Fox discovered he had the disease in 1991 and went public with the news seven years later.

He set up the Michael J Fox
Foundation for Parkinson's Research in 2000 and has become a leading
campaigner on the issue, particularly in the United States.

Another prominent sufferer is former heavyweight world champion boxer Muhammad Ali.

Back To The Future star Michael J Fox discovered he had the disease in 1991 and went public with the news seven years later.

Muhammad Ali attends the Sports For Peace Fundraising Ball at

Back To The Future star Michael J Fox also has the disease as well as former heavyweight world champion boxer Muhammad Ali

Closer to home, former Arsenal and Liverpool footballer Ray Kennedy has also been diagnosed with the disease.

He set up the Michael J Fox
Foundation for Parkinson's Research in 2000 and has become a leading
campaigner on the issue, particularly in the United States.

Another prominent sufferer is former heavyweight world champion boxer Muhammad Ali.

Closer to home, former Arsenal and Liverpool footballer Ray Kennedy has also been diagnosed with the disease.

The 69-year-old from Suffolk has played a wide range of roles including starring as a minder in 1986 film Mona Lisa opposite Cathy Minder (both pictured right).

The 69-year-old from Suffolk has played a wide range of roles including starring as a minder in 1986 film Mona Lisa opposite Cathy Minder

Eight years earlier he played a gangster alongside Helen Mirren, right, in cult hit The Long Good Friday

Eight years earlier he played a gangster alongside Helen Mirren, right, in cult hit The Long Good Friday

He is also one of around 127,000
Britons with the disease, which is caused by a loss of brain cells that
produce a chemical messenger called dopamine.

Symptoms
differ from case to case but often include a tremor or fine shake while
the person is at rest, rigidity of muscles, slowness of movement and
unsteady balance.

Most sufferers are aged 50 or over but younger people can get it too. One in 20 is under 40.

There is no cure and scientists have been unable to work out why people get the condition.

Symptoms
can be controlled using a combination of drugs, therapies and
occasionally surgery, but often more care and support may be needed as
they progress.

The
disease was identified by – and named after – Dr James Parkinson who
wrote An Essay On The Shaking Palsy in 1817 which established it as a
recognised medical condition.