Anna Wintour arrives hours early to the Met ahead of tonight"s ball


Aren't you supposed to be fashionably late Anna Wintour arrives hours early to the Met ahead of tonight's ball

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UPDATED:

22:12 GMT, 7 May 2012

She is the doyenne of all things fashionable so one would expect Anna Wintour to arrive stylishly late to New York's Costume Institute on the day of its grand gala event.

And yet just hours ago, an elegant and demurely dressed Ms Wintour was spotted at the entrance of the Metropolitan Museum of Art being mobbed by paparazzi.

The reason A date to meet Miuccia Prada at the press preview of the Costume Institute's annual exhibition, Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations, in celebration of which the party this evening is held.

Fashionably early: Editor-in-chief of American Vogue, Anna Wintour attends the press preview for Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute

Fashionably early: Editor-in-chief of American Vogue, Anna Wintour attends the press preview for Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute

Ms Wintour arrived amidst a flurry of scrambling photographers and assistants rushing to fetch her Starbucks, according to eager fashion-loving Twitter users.

The Editor-in-Chief of U.S. Vogue proved she is always at the forefront of fashion by sporting a Prada spring/summer 2012 outfit in honour of the designer and her exhibition.

Style duo: Anna Wintour and Miuccia Prada at the press preview ahead of tonight's momentous gala where celebrities will descend upon the Metropolitan Museum of Art to celebrate the exhibition

Style duo: Anna Wintour and Miuccia Prada at the press preview ahead of tonight's momentous gala where celebrities will descend upon the Metropolitan Museum of Art to celebrate the exhibition

Always impeccable, she paired the bold printed jacket and matching skirt with subtle nude heels and minimal accessories.

Even her nails and toes were neutral giving the spotlight to the strong green, white and black patterned ensemble.

In anticipation of the benefit this
evening WWD is reporting that the famously controlling fashion icon has
issued instructions to her staff that they must all wear pink.

Allegedly this is a nod to the late designer Else Schiaparelli's penchant for the pretty colour.

Prada Ready to Wear Fall/Winter 2012-2013 show as part of the Milan Fashion Week on February 23, 2012

Anna Wintour at the Met Museum

Fashion forward: Ms Wintour wore a Prada creation from the spring/summer ready-to-wear collection 2012 and has reportedly ordered her staff to email her photos of their outfits for tonight's party for her approval

She has also apparently requested
that they take pictures of their outfits with a few different hairstyle
options for her approval.

The
pairing of Elsa Schiaparelli who died in 1973, and Prada initially came
as a surprise to the Italian who told reporters: 'When I think of her, I
think of the past.'

Impossible Conversations features
approximately 100 designs and 40 accessories by Elsa Schiaparelli from
the late 1920s to the early 1950s, and by Miuccia Prada from the late
1980s to the present, drawn from the Costume Institute's collection and
the Prada Archive, as well as other institutions and private
collections.

Sneak peek: Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations at the Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, during a press preview in New York on May 7, 2012

Sneak peek: Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations at the Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, during a press preview in New York on May 7, 2012

True art: The exhibit features approximately 100 designs and 40 accessories by Elsa Schiaparelli from the late 1920s to the early 1950s, and by Miuccia Prada from the late 1980s to the present

True art: The exhibit features approximately 100 designs and 40 accessories by Elsa Schiaparelli from the late 1920s to the early 1950s, and by Miuccia Prada from the late 1980s to the present

Beyond the grave: The exhibition focusses on an imaginary conversation between the two designers realised by Miuccia Prada and an actress playing Elsa Schiaparelli, filmed by director Baz Luhrmann

Beyond the grave: The exhibition focusses on an imaginary conversation between the two designers realised by Miuccia Prada and an actress playing Elsa Schiaparelli, filmed by director Baz Luhrmann

The inventive presentation features an
imaginary conversation between the two women, the deceased played by
Australian actress Judy Davis.

Ms Prada and Ms Davis sit at opposing
ends of a banquet table and discuss their lives, their careers in
fashion and what it all means to them, in a scene rendered on the screen
by filmmaker Baz Luhrmann.

Though Miuccia Prada had a hard time
understanding why she had been compared to the 1930s surrealist, she
later conceded that a ‘love for art and breaking the rules unite us.

Miuccia Prada appears on screen behind the exhibit

A 1935 evening dress, left, by Elsa Schiaparelli, and a 2004 dress by Miuccia Prada

Compare and contrast: Miuccia Prada told reporters initially that she didn't understand the pairing with Schiaparelli

Simplicity: The curators of Impossible Conversations wanted a show that focussed entirely on women following the success of the Alexander McQueen exhibit Savage Beauty last year

Simplicity: The curators of Impossible Conversations wanted a show that focussed entirely on women following the success of the Alexander McQueen exhibit Savage Beauty last year

Accessorise! Prada's inventive and flamboyant shoes are arranged artfully next to Schiaparelli's whimsical hats

Accessorise! Prada's inventive and flamboyant shoes are arranged artfully next to Schiaparelli's whimsical hats

The curators of the exhibition, Harold Koda and Andrew Bolton, were keen to mount a show entirely focussed on women following the tremendous success of Alexander McQueen's Savage Beauty exhibition drew record crowds.

Impossible Conversations juxtaposes Prada's eccentric shoe designs with Schiaparelli's whimsical hats and Prada's skirts with her fellow Italian's fitted, embellished jackets.

Resting at her hotel after a recent fall in preparation for tonight, she told the New York Times: 'I always kept some distance because the museum did everything – it is not something I am responsible for, I can’t control it.

'Now I like it – and I understand there actually were some similarities. But it is other people’s vision.'