A "trance-inducing" isolation pod for a bed, LED-lit walls instead of paint and internet reminders delivered by a smell-producing robot……

A 'trance-inducing' isolation pod for a bed, LED-lit walls instead of paint, and internet reminders delivered by a smell-producing robot… welcome to the house of the future

|

UPDATED:

17:29 GMT, 20 March 2012

Imagine being able to put the kettle on just by making a thumbs-up gesture, redecorate a room with the flick of a light switch and discover you've just received a new tweet thanks to a strawberry scent filling the room.

This could all be possible in the home of the future, according to experts at the Ideal Home Show.

The Home of the Future has been the centre piece exhibit of the show since 1928, and this year exhibitors have taken a plunge to illustrate how we will be living in years to come by submerging their vision of the future in a swimming pool.

The Home of the Future: The exhibit at the Ideal Home Show includes walls which can be lit by light rather than decorated with paint and a pod for relaxing in, far right

The Home of the Future: The exhibit at the Ideal Home Show includes walls which can be lit by light rather than decorated with paint and a pod for relaxing in, far right

The pool already existed at London's Earl Court but was emptied and dug out so the house and a 300-seat auditorium could be built into it. Water was then added again so that the house has a watery backdrop giving it a true futuristic feel.

The house features a numbers of gadgets which experts believe could become commonplace in years to come.

These include a 'trance inducing' transport Pod by Alberto Frias which is designed to replace the traditional bed or act as a space in which to relax and escape the world. It is big enough for one or two and can be filled with light and sound.

There's also the Olly, a robot designed to produce a fragrance based on your internet actions. A strawberry smell could indicate when you have a new tweet while a lemon smell could be a calendar reminder.

Dive in: The display at Earl's Court has been submerged in a swimming pool

Dive in: The display at Earl's Court has been submerged in a swimming pool

Hours spent decorating will become a thing of the past thanks to 'stretch walling from Creative Ceilings'. The semi-transparent walls can be lit in different colours via LED lights meaning you can change your decor with your mood.

In the kitchen, cooking will be made easier thanks to the De Dietrich Piano Zoneless hob. Using touch screen technology, the hob can be set in three different ways – so five pans will cook at separate temperatures anywhere on the hob, or with three separate temperature areas, or with the entire hob set at one single temperature.

Meanwhile, the Fagor Spoutnik, is a freestanding microwave with a domed design providing a 360 degree angle of what's heating inside to avoid over-cooking and make it easier to clean than a traditional microwave.

Cleaning around the house will also
be less of a chore thanks to the Robo TAP. It can be activated by the
tap of the foot and can be used to target precise spots of dirt as well
as general areas.

Strides have also be made
in gesture control. Using your ipad or a remote control to activate TVs
and gadgets is already becoming popular, but experts say this will be
developed further eliminating the need for a control – so curtains can
be drawn with a sweep of the hands and the kettle can be put on with a
thumbs up gesture.

How we'll live: The audience watch demonstrations of the gadgets including the Transport Pod, seen in the foreground, which offers a new chill out zone for the home or could replace the traditional bed

How we'll live: The audience watch demonstrations of the gadgets including the Transport Pod, seen in the foreground, which offers a new chill out zone for the home or could replace the traditional bed

Show ambassador and gadget expert Suzi Perry said: 'Within a few months there will be a lot more gesture control within the home. Although it’s not happening quite at the moment it’s interesting to see that this could be something that could be quite normal in the near future.

'We’re seeing technical fridges with different drawers set at different temperatures for certain types of food and dishwashers with drawers built in for easy access. People are starting to build technology into their homes rather than adding it as an afterthought.'

While some of these new ideas might seem outlandish, in the past, the Ideal Home Show has got it right on how we'll live.

In 1912, the vacuum cleaner made its debut there promising to revolutionise cleaning and in the twenties, they predicted that homes in the future will have colour TVs.

However, other ideas haven't become commonplace – we are not all driving cars that turn into a boat and a plane as predicted in 1928, nor all living in homes without windows with conveyer belts to send food around the rooms, as suggested in 1936.

Future living: The gadgets set to transform our homes…
THE TRANSPORT POD
Pod

This egg-shaped furniture is the perfect place to escape the world. It can be filled with light, music and vibrations. It's lined with fluffy cushions and has a temperature-controlled waterbed. Sound vibration from a subwoofer creates a massage effect while the domed ceiling can be lit to resemble a perfect blue sky

FAGOR SPOUTNIK
spoutnik

This freestanding microwave has an innovative domed design and illuminated turntable. It can accommodate a wide range of dishes and provides a 360 degree view of what’s cooking inside. It has four cooking options with an adjustable timer and the makers promise it's easier to clean than a traditional microwave thanks to its translucent lid

THE ROBO TAP
The robo tap

This robotic vacuum cleaner can be used to target an exact area for cleaning. An IPS system aligned with a simple remote control is attached to the shoe or slipper of the user. Two taps on a dirty spot directs the Robo TAP to the precise area for cleaning. Two more taps will cancel the order and three taps returns the vacuum cleaner to its automatic programme

DE DIETRICH PIANO HOB
The piano hob

This works using 'zone less' induction technology. The Piano is controlled using an interactive TFT touchscreen. there are three cooking modes: expert – where five pans will cook at separate temperatures anywhere on the hob; piano, which segments into three separate temperature areas and solo, where the entire cooking area is set at one single temperature

The
Home of the Future, powered by Virgin Media, is at the Ideal Home Show,
Earl's Court, London, until April 1. For more information visit
www.idealhomeshow.co.uk